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Isadore Hamlin, 74, a Pioneer in Zionist Movement, is Dead

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Isadore (Itzik) Hamlin, a pioneer of the Zionist movement in America, died here Friday after a long illness. He was 74 years old.

For close to two decades Hamlin worked for the American Section of the World Zionist Organization, which promotes aliyah and Jewish education in the Diaspora.

When the American Section came into being in 1971, Hamlin was picked to be its first executive director. In 1974, he took over as executive vice chairman, a position created specifically for him. He retired from the office in 1988 but continued serving as a special consultant.

“Mr. Hamlin played a pivotal role in the development of the Zionist movement in America,” said Bernice Tannenbaum, chairman of the WZO-American Section. “His devotion and dedication for everything Zionist and pro-Israel was exemplary.”

During World War II, Hamlin reached the rank of captain in military intelligence in the U.S. Army and was also decorated with the Bronze Star. While serving in the Army in Europe, he assisted Jewish concentration camp survivors to immigrate to what was soon to become Israel.

After the war, Hamlin took a post in Washington with the Jewish Agency and later served as executive director of its American Section.

Besides his professional posts, Hamlin served on the board of directors of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency and was active in the United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York.

Hamlin, who was born in Cambridge, Mass., in 1917, graduated from Cornell University and did graduate work at the New School for Social Research. Funeral services were held here Sunday.

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