Matzo or ciabatta?

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

The hardest part of Passover? Giving up wheat for a week, hands down.

But as Rachel Neiman reports for Israel 21C, Israelis this year can buy a gluten-free ciabatta bread that’s kosher for Passover – if you follow Sephardic customs, which permit eating pulses.

And ciabatta’s quite the fashion in Israel.

Some years ago, Israelis took a liking to an Italian bread known as ciabatta. Since then, the local version of these small, elongated loaves has — like a lump of out of control sourdough — morphed into something so wildly different from the original that visiting Italians barely recognize that which most Israelis today call a “jepata” or, worse yet and more embarrassingly, “Geppetto.”

Most Jews observing Passover, however, will continue to munch on matzo, like this made by Matzot Aviv in Bnei Brak.

 

And for the more observant, shmura matzo like this version made by Manischewitz in Newark, N.J.

NEXT STORY