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  • Arts & Culture New Jazz Cd Shows Contribution of Czech Jew Persecuted by Nazis

    The Nazis called it “Judeo-Negroid” music and banned it from German radio. Joseph Goebbels once described it as “music in which rhythm is indicated primarily by the ugly sounds of whining instruments.” But the Nazis’ attempts to limit the popularity of jazz and swing music were to prove fruitless — thanks, in no small measure,… More ▸

  • Czech Seeks to Turn Aging Shul into Czech-german-jewish Museum

    Michal Klima was surfing the Internet last October when he discovered that a crumbling 19th-century Czech synagogue was up for sale. Fearing that it might be turned into “a hotel or something worse,” the director of a Czech Internet publishing company embarked on a quest to turn it into a museum of local Czech-German-Jewish history…. More ▸

  • Czech Jews Blocked on Return of Government-held Properties

    Czech Jewish leaders are considering legal action against the Czech government after it withheld two pieces of real estate due to be returned to Jewish hands under restitution laws. The government recently approved the return of 16 state-owned properties confiscated by the Nazis or the former Communist regime but exempted two others currently owned by… More ▸

  • Obituary a Symbol of Czech Jewry, Prague Cantor Passes Away

    One of the most prominent spiritual figures in Prague’s Jewish community has passed away. At least 300 mourners attended the funeral Sunday of Viktor Feuerlicht, cantor of Prague’s world-famous Old-New Synagogue, who died last week at 84 after a long illness. Mourners included the Israeli ambassador to the Czech Republic, Arthur Avnon. “It was a… More ▸

  • Book on Jews Both Anti-semitic and Racist, Czech Lawsuit Says

    A Czech academic is being taken to court over a book on Jews that critics say is potentially more dangerous to today’s Jews than “Mein Kampf.” “Taboos in Social Sciences,” by the Czech psychologist Petr Bakalar, includes the theory that Jews who left Europe before the Holocaust were more intelligent than those who stayed behind…. More ▸

  • Around the Jewish World Czech Jews Praise Havel, Uncertain About Successor

    Czech Jews are wondering whether the country’s next president will prove as staunch a friend of the Jewish community as was Vaclav Havel. Havel, who served two terms as president of the Czech Republic before stepping down on Feb. 2, was warmly regarded by the Jewish community for his readiness to confront anti-Semitism and keep… More ▸

  • Arts & Culture Czech Writer Tries to Recapture the Reality of Nazi Death Camps

    “So I am Jew and it is fate,” Arnost Lustig says with a bittersweet smile as he strolls across the Charles Bridge in Prague. The Czech-born, naturalized American author is reflecting on his recently published book “Lovely Green Eyes,” which has received rave reviews from both British and American literary critics. The book’s teen-aged heroine,… More ▸

  • New Law May Delay Recovery of Prewar Properties, Czech Jews Fear

    Czech Jewish communities fear that a new law could delay the return of property confiscated by the Nazis or the former Communist regime. The communities already have been handed about two dozen state-owned properties — including cemeteries, buildings and vacant land — under a government scheme to mitigate losses sustained by Jews in the former… More ▸

  • Golem Legend Returns to Life with Czech, Argentine Backing

    One of Prague’s most popular legends sprang to life this month with a series of events celebrating the story of the golem. According to legend, the golem was a man of clay brought to life in the late 1500s by Prague’s revered Rabbi Judah Loew to protect the Jewish people from persecution. In one telling,… More ▸

  • Czech Jews Shocked As Conviction of ‘mein Kampf’ Publisher Overturned

    Czech Jewish leaders are dismayed that the country’s Supreme Court has overturned the conviction of a publisher of “Mein Kampf.”After publishing thousands of copies of Hitler’s anti-Semitic text in Czech without footnotes or disclaimers, Michal Zitko was fined about $60,000 last year for “supporting and promoting a movement aimed at suppressing human rights and freedoms.”… More ▸