Latin America

  • El Salvador Seeks Recognition for Little-known Nazi-era Rescue

    El Salvador is home to only 120 Jews, but this small Central American nation of 7 million has long portrayed itself as a solid friend of Israel and the Jewish people. For years, the Salvadoran government has condemned anti-Zionist resolutions at the United Nations, and until August 2006 it was one of only two countries… More ▸

  • Jews Leaving Bolivia As Morales Favors Socialism, Iran, Chavez

    More than any other single event in recent years, the future of Bolivian Jewry may be determined by the outcome of the country’s upcoming national referendum on a new constitution. The proposed constitution calling for increased state control of private-sector enterprise is being fiercely opposed by many middle- and upper-class Bolivians, including the country’s Jews…. More ▸

  • Venezuela and Iran Use Oil to Build Alliance Against West

    It’s nearly impossible to find flour, eggs or fresh milk in the neighborhood supermarket, but in Venezuela you can fill your car’s tank for just 6 cents a gallon even as world oil prices hit $100 a barrel. That’s not the only paradox in President Hugo Chavez’s country, the largest oil exporter in Latin America…. More ▸

  • Despite Chavez’s Reforms, Most Caracas Jews Do Well

    The question of whether Jews have a future in Venezuela seemed far from the minds of the 900 or so people at the wedding of Jessica Horowitz and Alberto Israel. On Saturday night, a day before a crucial referendum on Venezuela’s constitution, Jews at the Union Israelita de Caracas synagogue in suburban San Bernardino were… More ▸

  • As Chavez Goes Authoritarian, Venezuela Jews Fear for Future

    Venezuelans heading to the polls in a little less than three weeks will be voting on some rather drastic changes to the nation’s constitution. The amendments that are expected to pass will abolish presidential term limits, allowing President Hugo Chavez to be re-elected indefinitely, and give Chavez’s government total control over Venezuela’s Central Bank, many… More ▸

  • Keeping Teens off the Streets, Argentine School Trains Young Jews

    It was getting late on a recent Wednesday night, but a group of Jewish teenagers stayed huddled in a fifth-floor office here practicing their Hebrew in between bites of cookies. Next door, another group danced to thumping Israeli music, moving around a room decorated with maps of Israel and Hebrew stickers. There were no notebooks… More ▸

  • Englander Ends Wait for First Novel with Tale of Disappearance in Argentina

    Nearly a decade ago Nathan Englander rocked the literary world with a debut short story collection that gave life to longing through a set of Orthodox Jewish characters yearning for lost love, youth, heritage or freedom. So it’s not surprising that in his highly anticipated debut novel, “The Ministry of Special Cases,” Englander again tackles… More ▸

  • Annual Argentine Report Notes a Sharp Rise in Anti-semitism

    A Hitler poster displayed at a parking lot on the outskirts of Buenos Aires. Anti-Semitic graffiti in a provincial public school. Swastika T-shirts sold at a national beer celebration. Anti-Jewish chants by fans at soccer stadiums. A threat to turn a schoolboy into soap. These were among the incidents detailed and analyzed in a comprehensive… More ▸

  • Argentine Jews Can’t Turn the Page on Anti-zionist Panel at Book Fair

    A day after a panel discussion on the 1994 bombing of Argentina’s central Jewish institution took on anti-Israel and anti-Semitic tones, a group representing victims’ relatives questioned why such an event should be held at a prominent book fair. “In almost 13 years since the murder of our relatives, the Book Fair organizers have never… More ▸

  • Bidding to Build Trust in Police, Argentina Turns to Anne Frank

    Sara Reales admits she wasn’t sure how visitors to an exhibit on Anne Frank would react to having security and police cadets as guides. After all, noted Reales, a 20-year-old from the outskirts of Buenos Aires, police had caused great suffering in Argentine history, and still are sometimes implicated in abuses. “I saw people’s faces… More ▸