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  • Around the Jewish World: Atlanta Theater to Feature Controversial Yiddish Play

    The Jewish Theatre of the South’s upcoming production features a Jewish brothel owner, a loving lesbian relationship and domestic violence. Since when is this Jewish theater? Since 1907, when European audiences attended the first performances of Sholem Asch’s Yiddish drama “God of Vengeance.” The play proved so potent when it was translated into English and… More ▸

  • News Brief

    Rabbi Sender Deutsch, a leader of the Satmar Chasidic community and longtime editor and publisher of the widely-read Yiddish newspaper Der Yid, died Sept. 2 at the age of 76. The noted orator and historian — who was also a vice president of the Satmar school system — was buried in the upstate New York… More ▸

  • High Holiday Feature: Italian Town with No Jews Hosting New Year Festival

    There is no Jewish community any more in Reggio Emilia, a town in northern Italy famous for its Parmesan cheese. During the High Holidays this year Reggio Emilia is co-host, along with neighboring Parma, of a three week arts festival aimed at providing Italians with complex insights into the deep and continuing influence Jews have… More ▸

  • Kafka, Prophet of 20th Century, Finds Home with ‘seinfeld’ Fans

    It’s an absurdity that Franz Kafka himself would appreciate. Some 1,500 people recently crowded into New York’s Town Hall for an evening devoted to a new translation of an unfinished novel that its author, now dead, had asked not be published. As Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Remnick put it as he opened the event, which… More ▸

  • Tour of Satmar School Provides Rare Glimpse of Girls’ Education

    The sweet sound of first-grade girls singing in Yiddish fades out as more than 50 small faces turn toward the door. They rise to greet Rabbi Hertz Frankel, their dean, who is accompanied by a rare visitor from outside the community. Frankel motions them to sit down and continue singing. But their teacher whispers that… More ▸

  • Collection of Yiddish Songs Revived by Italian Publisher

    A collection of songs by the Yiddish songwriter Mordechai Gebirtig has appeared for the first time in Italy. The collection includes Italian translations of all previously published works by Gebirtig as well as a number of recently discovered poems and songs by the author, who was killed by the Nazis in Krakow, Poland, in 1942…. More ▸

  • Looking Back at 5757: Shattered Ideals Color a Year Wracked by Disunity and Pain

    This was the year some of the Jewish community’s sacred cows were slaughtered. Many of the principles and causes closest to the hearts of American Jews were attacked — and, in some cases, mortally wounded — during 5757. Scandal and consolidation hit some of the most venerated institutions, while Jewish unity was fractured. But even… More ▸

  • Yiddish Book Center Enters New Era with Home of Its Own

    The National Yiddish Book Center has finally found a home, but in a setting about as far from the shtetls and cities where its books were penned as could be. Sunday’s dedication of a new, $8 million facility in the bucolic New England college town of Amherst, Mass., marked a new era for the center…. More ▸

  • Little-known Orthodox Group Inflames Jews Across Spectrum

    When a little-known organization of Orthodox rabbis disseminated a statement declaring Reform and Conservative Judaism “not Judaism at all,” angry reaction emanated from both Orthodox and liberal Jewish quarters. Nearly everyone — from the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, which many mistakenly thought was the source of the statement, to the organization of… More ▸

  • Writer Leo Rosten Dies; Popularized Yiddish in U.S.

    Leo Rosten, who translated his mamaloshen into English and helped make words like `shlep’ and `nosh’ part of the American vernacular, has died. He was 88. Perhaps best known for “The Joys of Yiddish,” which was published in 1968, Rosten also authored dozens of books of fiction, including mysteries, and non- fiction, as an amateur… More ▸