Amar’e Stoudemire scoring for United Hatzalah
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Amar’e Stoudemire scoring for United Hatzalah

Amar’e Stoudemire of the New York Knicks teamed with New York-area teens for a video on behalf of the Israeli ambulance service United Hatzalah. (Deborah Danon)

Amar’e Stoudemire of the New York Knicks teamed with New York-area youths for a video on behalf of the Israeli ambulance service United Hatzalah. (Deborah Danon)

In this season of good deeds, Amar’e Stoudemire is making a point.

In the upcoming NBA season, United Hatzalah is hoping the New York Knicks’ standout scores plenty of them.

Stoudemire, 31, has launched Amar’e Saves to promote a campaign that encourages youngsters to contribute to the Israeli ambulance service he has adopted as a cause.

A day before Sukkot began, Stoudemire filmed a video in his Manhattan apartment for the effort.

The campaign urges pledges by kids, individually or as a group, notably by tying donations to every point Stoudemire scores during the 2014-15 season. The Knicks will open Oct. 29 at home against the Chicago Bulls.

By Sunday, the campaign had 117 donors and $534 pledged per point.

Those raising the most funds will qualify for such prizes as Knicks’ tickets and a meet-and-greet with Stoudemire.

“Helping save lives is always a beautiful thing,” Stoudemire told JTA after filming with several New York-area Jewish teenagers. “It’s obviously something we all want to think about doing more of, but the fact that United Hatzalah has a much quicker rate for responding to emergencies is also very important.

“In today’s society, which is so fast, we need to be doing something about saving lives quicker, and United Hatzalah is doing that.”

Stoudemire became involved in the organization through his friendship with New York financier David Kleinhandler, like Stoudemire a co-owner of Israel’s Hapoel Jerusalem basketball team.

In an exclusive interview with JTA last year, Stoudemire discussed his spiritual connection to Judaism and his belief that he’s a member of the “Hebrew tribe.”

Stoudemire, a six-time all-star, is hoping to overcome the rash of injuries that relegated him to the bench last season.

After all, more playing time means more points — and more charitable contributions.