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Questions Affecting Jews Will Come Before League Assembly Next Fall

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(Jewish Telegraphic Agency Mail Service)

Three questions affecting the status of the Jewish population in European countries may come up before the Seventh Assembly of the League of Nations, which is to meet the coming fall, according to Mr. Lucien Wolf, secretary of the Joint Foreign Committee of the Board of Jewish Deputies and Anglo-Jewish Association, in a report submitted to the Board.

The questions are: first, relating to the numerus clausus law in Hungary; the second, affecting the procedure concerning the infractions of the minorities treaties; and thirdly the nationality law in Roumania. The Joint Foreign Committee has shown a great deal of patience regarding the denationalization of thousands of people in Roumania among whom there were from two to three thousand Jews. The Joint Foreign Committee received in 1924 assurances from the Roumanian Government that this question would be solved satisfactorily. Last year the promise was renewed by the Roumanian Government, but again left unfulfilled. Mr. Wolf stated emphatically that the Joint Foreign Committee could not continue permanently to exercise patience with regard to this question.

In moving the report of the Joint Foreign Committee, Mr. Wolf said that he was able to register a couple of small successes. In the matter of Schechita in Norway. the Joint Foreign Committee was solicited to intervene by the Norwegian Jewish Community, and the success obtained was not merely temporary but permanent.

The Norwegian Government was placed in possession of the views of the British and French Jewish Communities, and of the state of scientific opinion regarding Schechita. The result was quite satisfactory to the Norwegian Jews, the Storthing having referred the whole question to the Government with a request that it would enact a comprehensive law by decree. The Jewish Community of Oslo thanked the Joint Foreign Committee for their intervention.

The Joint Foreign Committee received a rather lengthy statement from the Persian Government to the effect that Jews in Persia enjoyed equal rights under the Constitution. The Joint Foreign Committee, although accepting the statement of the Persian Government addressed certain inquiries to the Persian Government on this question and was awaiting a reply.

At the request of the Jewish National Council of Poland, Lucien Wolf further reported the Committee brought before the Foreign Office certain grievances relative to the difficulty of obtaining British visas for passports of Jewish emigrants proceeding to the British Dominions. The matter is under the consideration of His Majesty’s Government.

The oppressive treatment of Roumanian Jewish emigrants who are deprived of their Roumanian nationality on leaving the country, and are otherwise ill-treated. was the subject of a correspondence with the Roumanian Ministry in London, which it was hoped would lead to a friendly settlement.

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