Viscount to Inaugurate Jewish Masons’ Lodge

(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

A Jewish Masonic lodge will be inaugurated in Sheffield by V’scount Laseelles. The inauguration ceremonies will take place the end of January. The difference between a Jewish Masonic lodge and a non-Jewish lodge is that the banquets in the former will be arranged according to Mosaic dietary laws.

For the first time in fourteen years, Philadelphia will be the seat of a District B’nai Brith Convention, when District No. 3 of the Independent Order B’nai Brith will convene there on January 30 and 31.

One hundred delegates representing West Virginia, Delaware. New Jersey and Pennsylvania are expected to attend the convention

At the same time the Board of Governors of the Erie Orphanage will hold their annual meeting.

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DIGEST OF PUBLIC OPINION ON JEWISH MATTERS

{NOTE}[The purpose of the Digest is informative. Preference is given to papers not generally accessible to our readers. Quotation does not indicate approval.--Editor.]{/NOTE}The repeal of the “national origins” quotas would not do away with the discrimination now in force against Jewish, Slavic and Latin immigrants, declares the “Jewish Independent” of Cleveland, in its Jan. 14 issue, wherein the reports from Washington that “immigration law worries President” and that Senator Shipstead demands repeal of the “national origins” clause, are discussed.

“It is quite true that peoples of Scandinavian origin, that is, of the race group that predominates in the Northwest (where Minnesota is located) are hit by the provision of the law which becomes effective next July. But discrimination is now in effect. It came into being with the enforcement of the 1910 census quota provisions of the law in 1921. It became still more drastically effective with the substitution of the 1890 census for the 1910 census, in the year 1924.

“If Shipstead of Minnesota is opposed to discrimination upon general grounds, let him demand the repeal of those sections of the law now in effect which allot to Great Britain and Germany and Norway and Sweden about 128,000 of the total of 165,000 newcomers now admitted in a year under the 1890 census quota provision.

“After all, cries of embarrassment at this stage of affairs are remarkably belated.

The pronounced chagrin that has arisen does not have its source in the resentment voiced by Americans of Slavic, Latin and Hebrew origin, at the slanderous propaganda set in motion by 100 per cent Nordic gentlemen who were active in the framing of the immigration policy. It is the Scandinavian, German and Irish protest that appears to have produced this agitation.

“Enactment of Mr. Shipstead’s repeal will not dispose of the question. Americans of Slavic, Latin and Hebrew origin should make that point quite clear.”

URGES KELLOGG TO ACT ON HAY’S PRECEDENT DAILY DIGEST OF PUBLIC OPLAION

Secretary of State Kellogg is urged by the “Day” to follow the precedent set in 1902 by Secretary Hay who intervened with Roumania in behalf of the persecuted Jews. Speaking of the sympathetic hearing given by Kellogg to the Jewish delegation, headed by Dr. Stephen Wise, which last week called on the Secretary and pleaded for U.S. intervention against Roumanian persecutions, the paper writes:

“Will the State Department again rise to the height to which it was lifted by Secretary Hay? Will it intervene in the interests purely of humanity for the ideals which have guided America in her historical development?

It should not be difficult for Secretary Kellogg to decide to take this step. There is political justification for it the persecuted Jews of Roumania are seeking to emigrate to America because of the treatment accorded them by their own country, and many of them are coming here. The situation created in Roumania has its effect on America, and in a certain sense there fore America is interested in the matter. The Jewish question in Roumania becomes a question for America, in regard to immigration and from an economic point of view. And then there is another reason not so much a political as a moral one. It is the duty of America to call for justice and humaniry. It is her duty to command the executioner to stay his ave. America has done it before on more than one occasion in her history and it is this attitude to occurrences in other parts of the world that has given America her alorious name and the moral authority which attaches to herutterances.”

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