Tells How Immigrants in South America Are Aided

(J. T. A. Mail Service)

In connection with the departure of the first group of emigrants under the immigration plan of the Hicern, Abraham Herman, president of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid and Sheltering Society of America who is now in Europe, issued a report on the work in South America.

In Urugnay an immigrant home had already been opened at Montevideo, where also a loan and savings bank was being subsidised. An employment burean had also been established there. In Buenos Aires, an employment bureau had been opened. Special women committees had been formed in the new countries and the names of all unaccompanied female immigrants were sent to these committees who meet the newcomers on their arrival

A Jewish-Spanish dictionary was in course of preparation.

They were gathering information regarding these new immigration countries and providing intending emigrants with complete and authoritative data as to conditions in these countries and what they can do there; affording emigrants all possible protection; opening in various European centres language courses, trade courses and instruction in agricultural pursuits; organizing in the new countries local immigrant aid societies and subsidizing and establishing immigrant homes at the various ports of arrival where these immigrants can be received and sheltered until they are settled.

In various parts of Poland, Bessarabia, Latvia and France agricultural courses were being given to intending emigrants. Some were working on farms others in vineyards so that they should be able to find work immediately when coming to the new country. Schools for teaching the languages of the countries to which these emigrants were going had been opened in Poland, Lithuania. Larvia and Roumania, Mr. Herman said.

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