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Seminar on Relations of Christians and Jews

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A seminar on the Relation of Catholics, Jews and Protestants, under the auspices of the Calvert Round Table of Boston, will be held at Harvard University on the invitation of President A. Lawrence Lowell, on November 12-13, it has been announced by the officers of the Round Table, a recently organized club of layment of the various faiths.

The seminar has been organized for the purpose of discussing the causes of religious and racial intolerance and the methods whereby misunderstandings may be minimized and eliminated.

The plan of the seminar follows that of one held at Columbia University, January 30-31, 1929, under the auspices of the National Conference of Jews and Christians. Invitations are being mailed to representative laymen, women and clergymen, throughout the New England States. It is also hoped by the organizers that this venture on the part of laymen of the various faiths will result in similar practical efforts throughout New England.

The officers of the Calvert Round Table of Boston are P. A. O’Connell, President; Ralph Adams Cram and Carl Dreyfus, Vice-Presidents; Walter F. Downey, Secretary; and Frederick A. Carroll, Treasurer.

The Advisory Committee of the Calvert Round Table who are making arrangements for the seminar consists of Bernard J. Rothwell, chairman; Jeremiah E. Burke, George W. Coleman, William J. Cooney, Louis E. Kirstein, Ralph Adams Cram, Joseph Lee, Judge Frank Leveroni and Judge M. H. Sullivan. Headquarters of the seminar have been established at 177 Milk Street, Boston. Benson Y. Landis, a secretary of the Federal Council of Churches, New York, is the director of the seminar.

Sam Garber, prominent Cleveland leader, died in Mt. Sinai Hospital after swallowing poison in his home. For twenty years he was active in community affairs. For several years he headed the fourteen branches of the Talmud Torahs here as president and was greatly devoted to the cause of Jewish education. He was president of the Hebrew Free Loan Association. Bad health and fear of losing a leg is believed to have been the cause of his act.

The purchase of a building at 422 East Seventy-second Street, New York, was announced by the Murry and Leonie Guggenheim Foundation, which has completed the assemblage of a large plot to serve as the site for a building which will be the first unit in the foundation’s plans for a comprehensive city-wide system of free dental clinics for children. The unit will represent an outlay of between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000.

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