Financial Situation Bars Hebrew in Detroit Schools

The financial situation of the Detroit Public Schools prevents the introduction of Hebrew studies in local high schools, according to a statement made by Frank Cody, superintendent of schools, to the Detroit representative of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

Mr. Cody, upon being informed of the steps taken to teach Hebrew in high schools in New York, and when asked whether there is a possibility of adding Hebrew to the curriculum of Detroit high schools in the near future, made the following statement:

“I am in favor of introducing into our Detroit high schools the study of any foreign language, provided (1) that it has a rich literature, (2) that there is a sufficient demand from the public to justify the employment of a teacher, (3) that the colleges will recognize it as constituting a proper substitute for Greek, Latin, French, German, or Spanish, and (4) that the state of our funds will permit this addition to our curriculum. The first of these requirements is entirely met by Hebrew. In order to employ a teacher, we should have in any one high school or combination of high schools not less than 175 pupils. College recognition is a matter which can be secured only by conference with individual colleges. At the present time, however, our financial situation is such that it does not seem advisable for us to undertake any expansion of our curriculum.”

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