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Arab Papers Complain Against Arab Leadership in Palestine and Hope Peace May Be Established There Be

Complaints against Arab leadership in Palestine and a hope that peace may soon be established between Arab and Jew there are voiced in recent issues of two Arabic papers in Palestine, “Al Iqdam” and ” Al Salam.”

While some Arabs would be greatly pleased if, as a result of the Inquiry Commission’s findings, immigration to Palestine were restricted and land purchase prohibited, says “Al Iqdam,” their apparent pleasure would only be on the surface. “In truth,” says this paper, “their deepest wish is: ‘Would that ships might bring immigrants to our shores every day, so that we could sell our lands to them at high prices.’ And the proof of this is that the city dwellers—even the rich ones—hover about the doors of Jews seeking prospective purchasers for their lands. Is this not a sign that we cannot succeed in our political activities? For success can only result if we actually practice what we preach. But we have not yet made this sacrifice on the altar of consistency. For this reason we are continually meeting with failure and defeats in our political actions.

“Therefore, we believe that our political policy will not be brought about through the decisions which the Commission of Inquiry submits on one day, and which on the next day the British Prime Minister, Mr. Macdonald, brushes aside in a statement of fewer words than can be counted on one’s fingers. Nor can the welfare of Palestine be assured if we are led by a group of men who bargain us away, buying and selling us like cattle, all the while pretending to work for our good, whereas really they are not working for our good.

“The welfare of Palestine,” concludes “Al Iqdam,” “can be brought about only if there is peace among the different parts of the Palestine population. May God help that this wish shall be realized.”

“It is true that there is a movement on foot against the leaders,” says “Al Salam.” “This is proved by the meetings at Nazareth, Tiberias, Acre and Ajur. The fellaheen are indignant at the townsfolk and charge them with all the evils that have lately occurred. It is not less true that the people who have contributed to the expense of the Delegation would not have done so had not the money been almost forced from their hands.

“Even now the leaders have failed to raise all the money they need in spite of their efforts. The fellah finds that his interests are not identical with those of the townsman and he is indignant that the religious leaders should have misled him and incited him against his neighbors, thus bringing about murder and robbery. The fellah is now only too anxious to set up his own institutions.

“The political situation is painted in false colors by the present leaders and by the Arab press. Even the Arabs of the towns are divided and are throwing over the old political party. The Arab people have not yet said their last word on the Arab-Jewish question. When this word has been said it will not be one of hatred and war, but one of peace and brotherhood, as is suitable for two people who live in one country.”

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