J. D. B. News Letter

Under the slogan—”For the creation of work and against boycott,” an exhibition of the work of Jewish artisans was opened here under the patronage of the Jewish community of Berlin.

Particularly impressive at the exhibition are the Jewish achievements in decoration work, the furnishing trade, and wrought iron work. Considerable attention has been attracted by the work in gold and silver executed by a Jewish woman artisan.

The exhibition occupies 35 rooms and numbers 120 stalls.

At a press reception, the President of the Union of Jewish Artisans, Herr Louis Wolff, referred to the history of Jewish artisanship in Germany, and pointed out that before the Jewish emancipation in Germany the Jews were forbidden to engage in any craft. The first Jewish Artisans’ Guild was established in 1813, and the present Artisans’ Union looks back on a history of 35 years.

The aim of this Union was to abolish the prejudice which existed among the Jews against artisanship and to convince the outside world that Jews are willing to engage in manual labor. The aim of the present exhibition is to help the Jewish artisan to overcome the boycott agitation conducted against him in Germany.

In various parts of Berlin and also in the provinces leaflets are being distributed with the slogan—”No orders for Jewish artisans.” Even the Artisan Guilds fight against the Jewish artisans.

In the invitation issued by the Artisans’ Union it is stressed that no claim is put forward to counteract the anti-Semitic slogan “Don’t buy from Jews” with such slogans as “buy from Jews only.” We do, however, ask our coreligionists to consider favorably the work of the Jewish artisans in their hour of need, the invitation urges.

The “C. V. Zeitung,” the organ of the Central Union of German Citizens of Jewish Faith, in a special issue devoted to the exhibition welcomes the enterprising spirit of the Jewish artisan and points out the part played by him in the life of the Jewish Communities in Germany. It calls upon the Jewish population to extend its support to hard-hit Jewish trade.

Rabbi Leo Shubow has been named Rabbi of Temple Israel, Amsterdam, N. Y. Rabbi Shubow received his degrees of Master of Hebrew Literature and Rabbi at the Jewish Institute of Religion last June. He is a graduate of the Boston Latin school and studied at Harvard College, Columbia University and New York University.

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