Nazis Seek to Entice U.S. Correspondents into Propaganda Jobs

American newspapermen in Germany are receiving attractive offers from the Ministry of Propaganda and other government agencies as the Nazi regime, not entirely satisfied with the work of its propaganda agencies in all parts of the world in creating a more favorable attitude toward the policies and program of the Third Reich, seeks to control the formation of world public opinion.

Charles L. Flick, a member of the Berlin bureau of Universal Service, is one of the newspapermen known to have been offered a position with the propaganda department. Pat McGrady, an American newspaperman who was in Germany for several months last Summer, was invited to engage in Nazi propaganda work in the United States. Outlines of proposed articles justifying the Nazi persecution of the Jews and explaining the Aryan racial theories were prepared for him by a government agency.

The arrest of Noel Panter, correspondent of the London Daily Telegraph, on trumped-up charges, was not against Panter himself so much as it was a covert threat to all foreign correspondents in Germany, as was the notification to Edgar Ansel Mowrer, famed correspondent of the Chicago Daily News, that his safety in Germany could no longer be guaranteed.

Reports that Charles L. Flick, a Universal Service correspondent in Berlin, had been offered a position with the German propaganda department, were confirmed at the offices of Universal Service in New York. It was declared there that Mr. Flick had been offered a position with the propaganda department at a larger salary than he had been receiving for his newspaper work, and had notified his superiors, who thereupon raised his salary.

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