The Reader’s Forum

(The editors reserve the right to excerpt all letters exceeding 250 words in length. All letters must bear the name and address of the writer although not necessarily for publication.)

To the Editor, Jewish Daily Bulletin:

I was very happy to read the announcement in your excellent little paper the other day that Eugene Lyons will conduct a column, “Black on White,” beginning Wednesday.

What particularly pleased me about the announcement was the fact that Mr. Lyons, whose articles in the general press I usel to read with great interest, will not be restricted to commenting on the Jewish scene alone.

I think that this will mark an excellent and much-needed departure from the usual policy of The Bulletin. If other readers of this paper are anything at all like myself, they will also feel that departing from a strictly Jewish policy in presentation of news and features will be a distinctly progressive step. I see no reason why eventually news of a general nature should not be founded in your columns.

Personally, I am fed up with the ordinary run of New York newspapers. However, they are still indispensable. If The Bulletin should see fit to present general news as well as news of peculiar interest to Jews alone, I am certain that a large circulation for your paper could be obtained among people like myself who are tired of the cut-and-dried general news.

So, more power to Lyons and to The Bulletin. I’ll be eagerly looking forward to the day when the paper takes a real shot at the general side of the news, still retaining, of course, the Jewish news as a highly developed specialty.

Fred Wilkins.

New York City.

November 18, 1934.

LIKES ‘NEWS’ CONTEST

To the Editor, Jewish Daily Bulletin:

There are several excellent features your publication is now giving its readers that I think should be made known to the public at large.

One that I have in mind that appeals strongly to me is the “biggest Jewish news of the week” contest now running. Why all the secrecy about it? It seems to me that a contest of this sort should be very widely advertised throughout the city by means of posters and other well-known promotion methods. I miss the brief radio periods formerly conducted by the Bulletin. A radio program weekly, over which the contest and the results could be announced, would be an excellent means of creating added interest in a publication that really deserves a wide public following. B. G. S.

New York City,

November 16, 1934.

When the Crusaders in 1906 hunted the Jews of Cologne, Samuel Ben Jehiel pronounced a blessing before killing his son and then handed the knife to a friend, to have his own life ended.

Samuel Ha-Nagid was vizier to King Habus, Berber king of the eleventh century.

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