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The Stage in Review

With the Yiddish theatre season coming to an end soon, preparations are being made by several Jewish troupes for provincial tours. Some of the Jewish artists are also contemplating spending their Summer months in Hollywood, on film productions.

The most fortunate of all the Yiddish artists is Molly Picon, the favorite of the Jewish stage. Miss Picon received this week not less than four invitations. One came from the Majestic Film Company, inviting Miss Picon to appear in two England films on Jewish life. Another came from London, asking Miss Picon to appear in one of the larger London theatres. A third offer came from Argentina. The fourth invitation is from the RKO, for a tour of the United States.

The New York Art Theatre, which has given a number of successful productions this season under the direction of Joseph Buloff, is making preparations to complete its season at the New York Art Theatre on Second avenue and to move for guest performances to theatres in Brooklyn and the Bronx.

Mischa and Lucy German, the well-known Yiddish artists of the Parkway Theatre, announced this week that they are proceeding to the Argentine and will start their productions in Buenos Aires during the week of Passover.

The Artef Theatre, which had a very successful season on Broadway, is continuing to give Soviet performances in Yiddish and is drawing large crowds. Especially successful is the play “Dostigeieff,” based on the works of Maxim Gorki, the famous Russian writer.

The return of Maurice Schwartz to New York early next week was announced Friday. After a nine-month absence from New York, Mr. Schwartz, the most prominent Jewish actor, will return to be feted at a large reception arranged for him by the Hebrew Actors’ Union.

Mr. Schwartz spent most of the nine months in Hollywood. During the last month he gave performances in twenty-two different cities in the United States. His last road performance is scheduled for March 6 in Philadelphia.

Nothing has been announced as yet concerning Schwartz’s plans for his work in New York. It is believed that he will decide on a European tour, together with a number of other prominent Yiddish actors. Mr. Schwartz would like to produce in European capitals the famous Yiddish play, “Yoshe Kalb,” which ran for months in New York with tremendous success.

The premiere of David Pinski’s play, “The Power that Builds,” will be given next Friday, March 8, at the Jewish People’s Theatre, under the direction of L. Kadison.

The play deals with Jewish life in Palestine. The entire ensemble of the New York Yiddish Art Troupe will participate in the performance.

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