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J.T.A. Survey Finds Nazi Chiefs Pushing Anti-Jewish Campaign

many may prove especially harmful to Germany in its negotiations with Great Britain.

AGITATION RISES

Despite the efforts of the government, however, to curb somewhat the wave of anti-Semitism, anti-Jewish propaganda inciting the German masses to terrorism and acts of violence, continues to pour forth in a steadily mounting stream.

Posters containing vitriolic slogans against the Jews and advertising Julius Streicher’s anti-Semitic weekly, are plastered all over the country. Special stalls for the sale of the Stuermer have been erected at all busy street-corners. The Stuermer is distributed in every town and hamlet throughout Germany, and everywhere forms the center of the wildest anti-Jewish agitation.

Only in the larger cities does the vicious anti-Semitic campaign waged by the Stuermer seem to be less effective. Indeed, a few of the suburbs around Berlin even report that as a result of Streicher’s obnoxious attack, trade in the Jewish establishments has increased somewhat.

GENERAL SITUATION IMPROVED

On the whole, however, the Jewish position throughout the country is less strained in recent weeks, as a result of the government’s efforts to curb the anti-Semitic drive. Only in Franconia are Jews living in a state of great uncertainty. Recent anti-Jewish manifestations there have contributed to make them somewhat panicky.

However, the problem of occupational reorientation of German Jews who have been deprived of their positions, and of Jewish youth which has no outlook for a job in the present Reich, continues to remain unsolved. The lack of jobs for Jewish youth makes the number of Jewish unemployed mount with every passing week. In Berlin alone there are now more than 15,000 Jewish unemployed, out of a total Jewish population there of 180,000. In the provinces the situation is only somewhat less serious.

Further corroboration was found of the fact that German Jews, who fled the country after the rise of Hitler to power, and who now return to Germany, are detained in concentration camps for indefinite terms, unless they give a written promise to leave Germany within a few days.

No charges are made against these Jews, and the only excuse given is that people coming back from abroad must first be trained in "the sense of national community of interest."

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