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40,000 Jews Released from Reich Prisons, Camps; Many Seriously Ill

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It was estimated today that 70 per cent of the nearly 60,000 Jews arrested during the November anti-Semitic excesses have now been released from concentration camps and prisons. Hundreds were sent back to their homes in recent weeks with serious lung disorders, fractured limbs and shattered nerves. Dr. Hans Reichman, erroneously reported released a fortnight ago, was released yesterday from the Sachsenhausen concentration camp after seven weeks’ internment.

(According to London reports, Robert Pell, assistant director of the Intergovernmental Refugee Committee said Chancellor Hitler had agreed to relax the campaign against elderly Jews provided that the young emigrate as soon as possible. The delegation which will go to Berlin — including Director George Rublee, Mr. Pell and two experts — will seek to work out plans for removal of “approximately 150,000 young Jews,” Mr. Pell said.)

The Bolivian Consulate here denied reports that large-scale immigration from Germany to the South American Republic had been facilitated, but said that Bolivia was continuing to grant visas on an individual basis. Preference was given, the consulate said, to persons with farming experience and capitalists with more than $5,000 in foreign exchange. In some instances, it was stated, visas were granted also to medical and scientific workers, provided that their applications were approved by the Bolivian Government. These instructions have so far not been modified, the consulate declared.

Since Jan. 1, a total of 200 emigrants from the Berlin district have been admitted to Bolivia, while the nine other Bolivian consulates in Germany have issued no visas.

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