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Details of Nazi Plot Revealed in Report by Uruguayan Body

A widespread German plot to take over Uruguay was described in the first sections of a report by the Congressional Committee Investigating Nazi Activities, made public here today. The committee claimed to have proof of the existence of a large and powerful military, political and economic Nazi network.

The German legation was declared to be directly implicated. Evidence produced by the committee was stated to prove that Otto Langmann, German Minister, had engaged in subversive activity.

The report charged that Uruguay has become the center of Nazi organizations throughout South America, excepting Brazil and Argentina.

The charges came officially to light today with publication of the proceedings of the first two secret sessions of Congress which heard the report of Julio Iturbide, secretary of the investigating committee.

Describing the role of Nazi diplomats as shown in the documents amassed by the committee, Iturbide said: “One constantly finds that Minister Otto Langmann has engaged in the activity of Nazism in Uruguay contrary to our institutions.”

In his report Iturbide criticized the attitude of Interior Minister Manuel Tiscornia, who for a long time had denied the existence of Nazi organizations in the country.

The committee came to 31 separate conclusions from the facts its investigators had gathered. Among them the most important were, in summary, as follows:

That a plan exists for the military occupation of the Republic with distribution of troops of the active army and of the reserve, placement of German officials, division of land, repression of attacks by enemies of Nazism, and the conversion of Uruguay into a colony of German peasants;

That the German Legation in Uruguay is participating in the political leadership of all the Nazi organizations in Uruguay, with Julius Dalldorf, the Nazi leader, functioning in the Legation and enjoying diplomatic immunity;

That the German Legation has been bringing contraband into the country in the form of abusive posters, propaganda injurious to countries friendly to Uruguay, films and radio sets, all in quantities far in excess of the needs of the Legation personnel.

Tomas Brena, chairman of the investigating committee, said 10 Nazi chieftains already arrested would be tried for crimes against the country. He said the Legation brought radios into the country in diplomatic parcels.

The roundup of known Nazi leaders continued. Officials today were questioning Julio Holzer, Nazi stormtroop chief, at police headquarters.

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