Many Jewish Officers and Men Cited for Gallantry on Far-flung U.S. Battle Fronts

Many Jewish officers and men participating in the war against the Axis on the far-flung battle lines of the United States from Libya to Gudalcanal were cited this week for gallantry in action, according to information released here today by the National Jewish Welfare Board.

Lieut. Martin Spector, 26, of Philadelphia, a physician attached to the Medical Corps, has been commended for bravery under fire in the Australian war zone. The citation lauds Lieut. Spector for “displaying a high order of courage and professional zeal. Upon a most unpleasant occasion he stayed at his post and treated wounded under fire.”

A non-commissioned officer with the Air Force in Egypt, Sgt. Herman J. Hochman, 22, of Rosenberg, Texas, has been cited for his work as bombardier of a plane which smashed four Nazi aircraft and sank a supply vessel attempting to bring aid to Rommel’s harrassed legions. Hochman finally got into the Air Force after having been rejected several times for minor physical and academic short-comings. An 18-year-old private from Chicago, Sherman Levine, has been posthumously honored with the award of the Purple Heart for heroism displayed in action on Dec. 7, 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Levine had already been in the Army a year when the United States was thrust into the war. On Gudalcanal, where hostilities between the Japanese and American troops continue almost unabated, Capt. Frank Mandel of Pittsburgh has been killed, it is reported by the Army. Capt. Mandel had participated in two major battles for the Solomons and had been stationed on Guadalcanal for several months, the J.W.B. discloses.

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