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Britain to Ask Uno to Discuss Unrra Relief Work; Not Connected with Morgan Ouster

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The British Government has decided to raise the question of UNRRA relief work for displaced persons at the forthcoming assembly of the United Nations Organization which opens here on Thursday, the press reports today.

This decision has nothing to do with the situation created by the dismissal by UNRRA of Lieut. Gen. Sir Frederick Morgan for his remarks concerning Jewish refugees from Poland, the report emphasizes.

The British press continued over the weekend to comment on the Morgan statement. The Manchester Guardian said that it is deplorable that an “outburst” of anti-British feelings took place in the United States following the Morgan incident. The paper emphasized that Gen. Morgan made his statement as an officer of UNRRA and not as a representative of the British Government.

The conservative Daily Telegraph called for “further clarification” in the “public interest” of Gen. Morgan’s statement. The paper points out that “whatever Gen. Morgan has to say about the conditions, conduct and movements of displaced persons with whom he was called on to deal, will receive careful attention. It is a matter of importance both in relation to British policy in occupied Germany and to the serious situation which has developed in Palestine.”

The liberal News-Chronicle also called for an inquiry into Morgan’s statements, asserting that “the General has said either too little or too much.” In urging an investigation of the remarks the evening labor paper The Star asserted: “It would be intolerable if a British general had expressed the astonishing views quoted.” After reviewing the sufferings of the Jews in Poland, Germany and Norway, the conservative Evening Standard commented: “To accuse this mass of wretchedness of a general conspiracy is in defiance of reason. That they should seek a happier home is understandable, but desire does not make a conspiracy.”

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