Chairman of Anglo-u.s. Palestine Inquiry Committee Sees Truman; Backs British Loan

Judge Joseph C. Hutcheson of Houston, who was American chairman of the now dissolved Anglo-American inquiry committee on Palestine conferred with the President’s Cabinet committee alternates about Palestine this week at the Committee’s request, before its departure for London, he said today after a call on President Truman.

The report of the inquiry committee was discussed by Judge Hutcheson with Henry F. Grady, Goldthwaite H. Dorr and Herbert E. Gaston, the Cabinet alternates, as well as “some things not written down which they thought I could tell them,” he told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. He found the alternates “very cooperative and interested in bringing about a solution.” They also talked with other members of the inquiry committee, he said.

Expressing himself strongly for passage by Congress of the British loan as a necessary part of United States foreign policy. Judge Hutcheson said that attempts to block it because of the Palestine issue would do a disservice to all Americans. A loan is either good or bad, he said, and in this case should not be judged in connection with the question of Palestine. He paid tribute to Dr. Stephen S. Wise’s support of the loan.

Congressman Arthur G. Klein of New York, in a speech to the House today, strongly supported the loan because it would promote financial stability in the world, thus promoting peace and friendly relations between nations. While sharply condemning the British “acts of terrorism” in Palestine he pointed out that not to pass the loan because of this issue would be an “act of cheap revenge…A most expensive luxury which we cannot afford at this time.”

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