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Bevin Rejects Churchill’s Demand in Parliament for Full Statement on Palestine

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin, refusing to make a full statement on Palestine, as was requested by opposition leader Winston Churchill, today told the House of Commons that the British Government is attempting to do two things in the present Palestine war:

1. To have the U.N. Security Council adopt a resolution on Palestine which would be sufficiently objective and impartial to have” a chance for acceptance by both sides in the conflict; 2.To use its influence to ensure the acceptance of a cease-fire in. the Palestine war.

He asked Commons to refrain from a debate, declaring that such a debate “would prejudice the present important discussions,” He also refused to consider a demand by W. Gallacher, Communist M.P., to issue a statement expressing “support for the maintenance of the state of Israel.”

PROBLEM OF BRITISH OFFICERS SERVING WITH ARAB LEGION UNDER STUDY

A Foreign Office spokesman confirmed today that the problem of British officers who are currently serving with the Transjordan Arab Legion is under consideration by the government. He said that the entire question will be solved in agreement with the Transjordanian Government, adding that the British Government “is using its test endeavors” in the Arab states capitals to bring about agreement to the U.N. Security Council’s truce orders.

Emphasizing the importance of a Joint Anglo-American approach to the Palestine problem, the spokesman denied that there is any ban on the disembarkation of immigrants at Haifa. He asserted that no instructions to that effect had been sent to Haifa nor had the British military commander in Haifa issued any such orders.

Meanwhile, diplomatic circles here say that Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin is considering whether or not he should recall to Britain the British officers now serving under King Abdullah, most of whom still take their orders from London. Bevin is reportedly anxious about these officers since it had not been anticipated that they would participate in the Arab bombardment of Jerusalem.

Any move to withdraw the 40-odd British officers now leading the Arab Legion, it is felt here, would do much to satisfy American opinion, but it is unlikely any such move will be made unless it is accompanied by “a corresponding gesture” on the other side.

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