Senate Body Urges U.S. to Prevent Resumption of Arab-israel War

Resumption of the Arab-Israel war “would be so inimical to American interests that the prevention of it must be one of the major points of United States policy,” it was urged today in a report on pending Mutual Security legislation issued by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

The committee reaffirmed its support of the tripartite declaration of May 25,1950, in which opposition was expressed to the use of force by any country in the Near East. The Department of State was prevailed on by the committee “to stress the fundamental determination of the United States to take appropriate action to prevent the resumption of warfare by any of the nations involved.”

Although “marked gains” were noted in some other parts of the Near East, they were “largely offset by the increased tension between Israel and the Arab states, “the report said. The committee stressed that “there have been more border incidents” between Israel and Jordan, and the incidents have been more serious. “The Soviet Union has increased its activities in the Arab states and is blocking constructive action in the United Nations Security Council for alleviation of tensions in the area,” the report stated.

It was stated by the committee that “there is nothing gained by minimizing the difficulties in the way of a permanent settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict.” Popular passions are high on both sides, and the armistice is plainly beginning to deteriorate, the committee reported. It warned “there is a danger that a border incident, either by accident or design, may ignite the resumption of open warfare.”

SENATE COMMITTEE DECIDES TO REDUCE U.S. AID FOR ISRAEL

American assistance for Israel in the new fiscal year was outlined to include $1,400,000 for technical cooperation, and an undetermined sum for developmental assistance. Because the committee considered Israel to be improving its economic status, it decided to reduce aid in the forthcoming year.

It is estimated that half of the United States assistance will be in the form of surplus agricultural commodities, one-fourth for import of petroleum products, and one-fourth for basic development needs. The technical cooperation program will give primary attention to continuing projects already under way for increasing agricultural production.

Commenting on the plight of the Arab refugees, the committee said it considers the problem as being one for the United Nations. “The United States should continue to cooperate with the U. N. in seeking a solution, even though some years may be required to find it,” it recommended.

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