Dr. Goldmann Hopeful on Moroccan Agreement for Jewish Emigration

There is hope that an agreement will be reached through negotiations to enable all Moroccan Jews who wish to migrate to leave that North African country for Israel or any other land, Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president of the World Zionist Organization, told the Zionist Actions Committee today.

At the opening session of the meeting, Dr. Goldmann reported that the experience of recent months had given ground for such hopes. He said that the freedom of exit of Moroccan Jews is a “principle we cannot forego.”

He noted the hopeful declarations of the Sultan and Premier of Morocco on this matter and said they would honor their word. Authorities in both Tunis and Morocco have kept their promises regarding Jewish equality, he pointed out, but economic conditions have deteriorated and the situation of the Jews–always difficult–had worsened.

Referring to the situation in Eastern Europe, he said that the door to Jewish emigration had been opened slightly and that the first group of Jews to be permitted to go to Israel from Poland in recent years would start within a few months. He expressed the hope that this migratory flow would be followed by the movement of Jews from other states in the region.

“We must regard such developments with satisfaction, although for the time being the changes in the situation are still insignificant,” Dr. Goldmann stated. “It is our duty as Jews and Zionists to do everything possible in order to establish contacts with Jewish communities in Eastern Europe and to try to influence the authorities in these countries to make it possible for the Jews there to lead a true Jewish life, such as does not exist there at present, and to create facilities for immigration to Israel,” he added.

SATISFIED WITH THE RESULTS OF FUND-RAISING IN THE UNITED STATES

The Zionist Organization, he reported, had reason to be satisfied by the results of fund-raising last year, particularly through the United Jewish Appeal and the Israel Bond campaigns in the United States. Excellent results were also obtained in South Africa, Brazil, Venezuela, Finland, and Sweden, he said.

Dr. Goldmann warned that it would be “a great mistake” to assume that the same results would be achieved this year without a great deal of effort “because these funds do not come automatically.” Should needs increase further, he underlined, still greater efforts will be required.

Despite many achievements by Israel there were still vital problems which remained unsolved, the president of the World Zionist Organization said. He was hopeful, however, that these would be solved through cooperation between the Jewish communities of the world and the Jewish State. He also spoke of unsolved security, political and economic problems.

Concerning decisions of the last World Zionist Congress, he said that nothing had yet been done on bringing non-Zionists into the Jewish Agency. He hoped to be able to do something on this matter when he is in the United States next month. He reported progress in other Zionist fields including education, culture, youth activities and pioneering.

He said that relations between the Zionist movement and the Israel Government were “satisfactory and cooperative.” He announced that the government-Jewish Agency coordinating board would probably meet for the first time since the Zionist Congress when Premier David Ben Gurion returns from vacation. The Agency, he pointed out, places great importance in the permanent, systematic working of the board on problems other than immigration and settlement. He expressed hope that tighter and more regular links would be developed between the government and the Agency.

NEXT STORY