Credit Restrictions on Exports to Israel Relaxed in Britain

British Government credit restrictions on exports to Israel have been relaxed since last fall when they were tightened following the Sinai campaign, Derek Walker-Smith, Minister of State for the Board of Trade, told Commons last night.

Replying to questions by Eric Johnson, Conservative, Mr. Walker-Smith said that the terms under which British exporters could obtain credit guarantees from the British Government for Israel deals were “considerably advanced” from what they were eight months ago. He denied that the government “imposed” any restrictions on trade with Israel.

The British Government and British trade associations were asked today to refuse to have anything to do with “improper, harmful practices” such as the extension of the Arab states economic boycott against British firms doing business with Israel.

In a resolution adopted at its biennial convention, the Trades Advisory Council called such a boycott “contrary to international trading customs.” The parley heard a report on the council’s activities in the promotion of legislation to prevent discrimination in employment. Lord Silk in was unanimously reelected president of the council.

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