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J.D.C. Chairman Rebukes Czech Reports Suggesting Jordan Committed Suicide

Louis Broido, chairman of the Joint Distribution Committee, today reiterated his rejection of Czech reports that Charles H. Jordan, the JDC executive vice-chairman, who vanished last Wednesday evening in Prague and whose body was found in a river there, has committed suicide. In a statement issued by Mr. Broido today, following his statement of yesterday, he said:

“The suggestion emanating from Czech newspapers, which must stem from official sources, that Jordan drowned as a result of a suicide is utterly rejected by us, I was with Mr. Jordan just a week before in Israel. He left me to start on his holiday. He was full of plans for future activities of the Joint Distribution Committee, We discussed an extension of our program in France, in Morocco and in Tunisia, When Mr. Jordan left me, he was full of ideas for the future.

“Secondly, approximately half a dozen people received here on Saturday post cards which we have here, written by Mr. Jordan on Wednesday and postmarked at the Prague post office, two of them at 11 p.m. that night. One of our assistants received a lengthy and detailed letter from him which set forth eight JDC matters requiring attention by us. Nothing in any of this mental activity or the spirit shown in these postcards would indicate the remotest possibility that this man contemplated suicide.

STRESSES IMPOSSIBILITY OF JORDAN’S TAKING HIS OWN LIFE

“In addition, from a purely practical point of view, Mr. Jordan would have been 60 years old in February, at which time he and his family would have earned very important rights under the JDC retirement and pension system, all of which may be seriously affected by his death prior to the age of 60. Mr. Jordan, who had no children, for over 20 years had a warm and the closest relationship with Mrs. Jordan and it is impossible to believe that he would be so oblivious to her future interests and to take his life at this point.

“We cannot come to any other conclusion than the utter rejection of the notion that Mr. Jordan’s drowning was self-inflicted or self-motivated.

“This brings up the question of who participated in his drowning. Of this we have no knowledge. Only the Czechs are in a position to determine this. We have no way of forcing them to express themselves or to confess what elements within such a tightly controlled country could accomplish this without the Government knowing it.”

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