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Week of Festivities for Yeshiva Cornerstone Laying is Proclaimed

November 2, 1926
See Original Daily Bulletin From This Date
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Orthodox congregations in New York City and throughout the country were urged to celebrate the week preceding December 5, the date when the cornerstone for the $5,000,000 Yeshiva College of America will be laid, at a conference of Orthodox congregations which was held last Sunday at the Hotel Pennsylvania under the chairmanship of Gedaliah Bublick. Mr. Samuel Levy, Judge Otto A. Rosalsky, Harris L. Selig and a number of rabbis addressed the conference.

The synagogues are to be decorated throughout the week preceding the cornerstone ceremonies which coincides with the Feast of Lights. Delegations are to be sent by each congregation to attend the ceremonies.

The holding of a national convention of all Orthodox congregations and Hebrew schools throughout the country was foreshadowed in a resolution adopted. The purpose of this convention will be, the resolution intimated, the creation of a national board of education which would have for its purpose the establishment of “appropriate standards for the education of our youth and to help create the proper facilities” for Jewish education. This step is to be taken, the resolution stated, “in cooperation with all bodies devoted to the maintenance and advancement of true Judaism.”

OFFERS EXPLANATION FOR HALLOWE’EN CELEBRATIONS

A reader of the “Jewish Daily Bulletin” who is an executive in one of the Y.M.H.A.’s against which criticism was levelled. in a quotation in the Digest, because of the celebration of Hallowe’en, offers the following explanation:

“In places far removed from New York, Hallowe’en is celebrated by all classes as a day of merrymaking and masquerading. It has lost all of its religious aspects, and outside of New York it is not considered a pre-election affair. I think, that were we to ask 100 Gentiles what Hallowe’en is celebrated for, 99 would never know or mention anything religious connected with it. In most small towns especially, the entire community takes part in a monster masquerade parade or in other manners of jollification.

“I remember years ago when residing in New York, that hoodlooms celebrated Hallowe’en by creating much mischief, but here the celebration is enjoyed by everybody. In fact many Jewish organizations hold dances, parties and other Hallowe’en amusements. The younger folks would celebrate Hallowe’en even if we did prohibit it, so the only remedy we have is to call our affairs “Autumn Masquerade Ball”, etc., and let it go at that.”

CORRECTION

A typographical error occurred in the report in yesterday’s issue with regard to Dr. Weizmann’s statement of the funds transmitted by the Keren Hayesod to relieve the economic situation in Palestine. Dr. Weizmann stated that another £20,000 is to be sent. The figure was erroneously given as £20,000,000.

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