Daily Digest of World Public Opinion on Jewish Matters

The “Jewish Morning Journal”, writing editorially on Nov. 18, disputes Mr. Louis Marshalls assertion, made the other day in his annual report before the American Jewish Committee, to the effect that the east-European governments are fulfilling their obligations with regard to “minority rights.”

“This may be true according to Mr. Marshalls own conceptions of this matter, but it is doubtful it the Jews living in the countries referred to would agree with him,” says the “Morning Journal.”

“Reports coming here from the young republics of eastern Europe and from the enlarged Roumania show that the Jews in those countries are denied their ‘minority’ rights, as well as their human rights in general.”

APPROVES REORGANIZATION OF NEW YORK “KEHILLAH”

The resolution adopted last Sunday by the Conference of New York organizations, which was convened by the American Jewish Congress, calling for the reorganization of the “Kehillah” of New York, is considered by the “Day”, in its editorial of Nov. 18, to be a step in the right direction.

“Among all the worthless and unnecessary resolutions adopted by the conference the only pratical one was that dealing with the reorganization of the ‘Kehillah’,” says the “Day”. “It is only local problem-yet it is none the less important. The organization of American Jewry is impossible as long as the Jewries of New York, Chicago Detroit and every other town and city remain an unorganized state.

“We hope that this will not be merely another ‘resolution’, but that it will result in something practical and concrete.”

COMMENDS AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE

An editorial in the “Jewish World” of Philadel phia (Nov. 18 issue) dwells on the annual conference of the American Jewish Committee, held in New York recently, and shows the contrast between the present attitude of the Committee toward certain Jewish problems and its attitude before the first American Jewish Congress was convened.

“We cannot help thinking of the great progress made since the first American Jewish Congress. Who does not remember how we had to fight for those very things which now form the bright spots in the annual report of the American Jewish Committee and which the Committee itself at that time so vigorously combatted?

“Mr. Marshall has the satisfaction of knowing that, although he did not share our convictions, he has played a conspicuous part in carrying out the decisions of the first American Jewish Congress.”

FIFTH AVENUE AND THE JEWS

The Jews should celebrate the 100th anniversary of Fifth Avenue with no less zeal than the members of the “400″ whose mansions are situated on that avenue, says the “Jewish Daily News” of Nov. 18.

“The marble palaces and the ‘exclusive’ clubs have made Fifth Avenue aristocratic”, says the paper. “But the huge department stores and office buildings, which are largely in Jewish hands have imbued the aristocratic avenue with life and beauty and cosmopolitan greatness.”

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