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Digest of Public Opinion on Jewish Matters

[The purpose of the Digest is informative: Preference is given to papers not generally accessible to our readers. Quotation does not indicate approval.--Editor.]

John D. Rockefeller’s contribution of $100,000 to the United Jewish Campaign, which is the largest sum ever given by a non-Jew to a purely Jewish fund, is the subject of editorial praise in the Jewish press.

The “Day” (May 24), pointing out that Jews have always been generous donors to non-Jewish causes, observes: “Rockefeller’s act is a new step. It is not merely a gesture, but a gift in proportion with the needs of the Jewish relief cause as well as with the size of Mr. Rockefeller’s contributions to other causes.

“It is a sign of getting closer, of good-will, that speaks more eloquently and more convincingly than all the Kosher banquets arranged for Jews and non-Jews.”

Jacob Fishman, writing in the “Jewish Morning Journal” (May 23) terms Rockefeller “a pioneer among Christian millionaires,” in adopting a principle which Jewish philanthropists have long ago followed in regard to general charity and even purely Christian institutions. “Rockefeller’s gift,” Mr. Fishman declares, “is especially welcome not so much because of the actual money as because of the spirit of tolerance and friendship to the Jews on the part of the oil king’s son.”

The “Jewish Daily News” writes in the same tone, averring that the contribution by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., is a graceful act and will be accepted with deep appreciation not alone because of the generous sum given but by reason of its implication. Need should know no creed, race, nor color. Jews have long given evidence of that belief in a practical manner. The outstanding gift of Mr. Rockefeller should help all realize that mankind is one and that after all one is responsible for his fellow-man.”

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