Menu JTA Search

Digest of Public Opinion on Jewish Matters

[The purpose of the Digest is informative: Preference is given to papers not generally accessible to our readers. Quotation does not indicate approval.--Editor.]

Whom did Congressman Johnson, leader of the anti-immigration forces in the House, have in mind, when he declared that only immigrants or those who descend from immigrants are opposed to the rigorous immigration laws, asks the “Jewish Morning Journal” of June 14, referring to Johnson’s address in the House, demanding the deportation of 1,400,000 aliens.

“Surely, it cannot be,” the paper remarks, “that he had in mind the simple fact that all inhabitants of America originate from immigrants, including himself and the other restrictionists. But the notion that the supporters of a liberal immigration law are exclusively immigrants of the first or second generation, is not true. There are many Americans of the older ‘stock’ who would like to see a liberalization of the law, and although their number is not so very large, and they do not let themselves be heard sufficiently, it should be remembered that the same is true of the immigrants and the children of the immigrants.

“If all the immigrants and their friends and relatives.” the paper goes on to say “would regard the immigration question with equal interest as Congressman Johnson. as important as he regards it as an issue of direct interest to themselves, the doors of America would be open wider than they are.”

THE ACTION OF CLEVELAND AND DETROIT

The organization by the Cleveland and Detroit Jewish Communities of all their Jewish national relief agencies into a permanent body to serve all necessary causes is lauded by the “American Israelite” in its current issue. Says the paper:

“This is an example that might well be followed. It would also be well as a part of the duty of such of these organizations, if they would appoint a permanent committee to examine all requests for contributions for foreign relief and give their endorsement to such as they found worthy. It might be established as a general rule that no one will give a contribution whether asked for by an organization or an individual whether at a public meeting, by mail or personally, unless it has the favorable approval and endorsement of such a committee.”

SARAH BERNHARD’S STATUE IN PARIS

The unveiling of a statue in Paris on Sameday to Sarah Bernharit, on which occasion the French Minister of Fine Arts and many distinguished private individuals and public officials attended is commenned on by Arthur Brisbane in his “Today” colomn in the New York “American” of yesterday.

The French banor themeselves in erecting this statue to a really great genius among women. And They honor the Jewish race, which produced Bernhardt,” Mr. Brisbane observes.

NEXT STORY