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Digest of Public Opinion on Jewish Matters

[The purpose of the Digest is informative. Preference is given to papers not generally accessible to our readers. Quotation does not indicate approval.--Editor.]

An analysis of the Palestine Municipal Franchise Law, which was published recently, is contained in an editorial of the “Christian Science Monitor” of Dec. 24. The paper writes:

“An important stage in the development of self-governing institutions in Palestine is marked by the publication of the Municipal Franchise Law, which foreshadows the holding of municipal elections. No such elections have as yet been held since the British occupation. Municipalities exist in the principal cities and have considerable power of administration and taxation. Up to the present, however, the City Fathers have been local residents nominated by the Government. Since 1921, a number of popularly elected local councils have been set up in the villages and smaller towns, but the only town of any size which has been provided with such a council is the Jewish settlement of Tel-Aviv. Even Tel-Aviv, though it has a population of about 40,000, is not a municipal borough in the full sense of the term, and still remains loosely attached to Jaffa, of which it was originally a suburb.”

Discussing the chief objections that have been levelled against the new law the “Christian Science Monitor” observes in conclusion:

“Before the law comes into force, at least a month will, in accordance with the usual practice, be allowed for public criticism. It is possible, therefore, that some changes may still be made before the elections are actually held. The elections are in any case expected to take place in the immediate future, and with twenty-two elected municipalities, Palestine will have made a considerable advance on the road to self-government.”

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