Resolution of Rabbis’ Convention Calls for International Peace

(Jewish Daily Bulletin)

The renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy was called for in a report submitted yesterday by a Committee on International Peace, at the thirty-eighth annual convention of the Central Conference of American Rabbis here. The report was read by Rabbi Joseph L. Kornfeld, of Toledo.

“International peace as an ideal found no finer expression than in our Bible,” said the report. “The Prophets of Israel had not only a most beautiful vision of peace, but the best understanding of the means of its attainment. The Prophet Isaiah had given to the world the best formula for domestic tranquility and international peace when he said: ‘The work of righteousness shall be Peace, and the effect thereof, quietness and assurance forever.’

“However distant the time when righteousness will become the spring of all our actions, thus removing all causes and provocations for conflicts, yet we hold firmly to the belief that the rule of right will eventually displace the rule of might. To this consummation, the best minds and hearts of humanity are working today possibly with greater zeal than ever before.

“Another indication of the aroused public mind in regard to international peace, and America’s responsibility to promote it, was the prompt expression of the American people regarding our attitude toward Mexico and Nicaragua, in removing the differences that may occur between us and our neighbors. There was a will to peace on the part of the American people, and they demanded of those in authority to find a way to peace.

“The nation’s attitude toward wartorn China is a matter of deepest concern of the lovers of peace in America and elsewhere. It is the hope of all right-minded people that China will soon return into the paths of peace, and that her unity and integrity will be unimpaired. It is very gratifying to note that our country, while doing her full duty to protect American lives and property, has been showing most commendable forbearance in a most irritating situation.”

A suggestion submited by the Committee on International Peace at the Couference recommended that the “Government of the United States should clearly show its desire to keep open the way for such further conversations as will lead to the adherence of the United States to the Permanent Court of International Justice.”

The Conference Committee on Goodwill recommended the renewal of the pact with the Federal Council of Churches of Christ which affirms that “because of our mutual respect of the integrity of each other’s religion and desire that each faith shall enjoy the fullest opportunity for its development and enrichment, these Committees have no prosyletizing purpose.”

Bitter denunciation of organizations which attempted to prosyletize Jews was voiced by delegates attending the convention. “Prosyletizing is a smoke screen for anti-Semitism,” declared Dr. M. H. Harris of New York, “and it is an insult to us that Christians should try to teach us a religion. This Conference should take a more aggressive attitude against the movement to prosyletize the Jews, which is the parent religion of Christianity. It is an insult to our religion and also an attempt to undermine the faith of our people in Judaism.”

Dr. Abram Simon of Washington, D. C., in his report on the Commission on Good Will declared that forty-nine cities have witnessed over one hundred good-will meetings during the year. The youth work, particularly in New York and Chicago. has developed friendly cooperation between young people’s groups where programs of social educational nature have been evolved. Dr. Simon declared that the Commission is at work upon a program which calls for a scientific study by a commission of psychologists and social workers of the causes of the difficulties between the Jews and Christians and of the creation of a program for the removing or offsetting their cause. The report further stated “that the appeal to Christians to aid the Jewish relief work in Europe was strongly supported by the Christian members of the Commission on Goodwill.”

“The religious life of the Jewish student must be carefully watched,” declared a report of the Committee on Religious Work in Universities read at the afternoon session yesterday by Rabbi L. E. Marcuson of Macon, Ga.

A resolution was unanimously adopted by the Conference condemning the recent outbreak of ill-treatment of three Jewish internes at Kings County Hospital. Brooklyn and commending Mayor Walker for his prompt action toward full investigation of this incident.

The motion was introduced by Dr. Abram Simon of Washington, and Dr. Frederick Cohen, of Omaha. Neb. The resolution read in part:

“Whereas we are reliably informed that on June 20, 1927, three Jewish internes of the Kings County Hospital. in Brooklyn. N. Y., were victims of a hazing attack by six non-Jewish internes, and

“Whereas, this evidence of anti-Semitic hostility in a city-owned institution is especially reprehensible, and shocks the sensibilities of well-thinking men and women of all denominations, and thus interferes with the orderly progress of good will in our national life.

“Therefore be it resolved that the Central Conference of American Rabbis, in session assembled, condemns this recent outbreak of ill-will and commends Mayor Walker for his prompt action toward a full investigation of this unfortunate incident.”

“Our legal rights have been imperilled in this city hospital.” declared Rabbi Louis Gross of New York. This hospital belongs to all creeds and it is especially reprehensible that such a condition should exist in an institution of this kind.”

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