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Washington Officials to Confer with Chas. Levine’s Representatives

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(Jewish Daily Bulletin)

A conference will be held in New York City between representatives of the Department of Justice and Samuel I. Hartman and Charles H. Innes of Boston, attorneys for Charles A. Levine, after the latter’s return to the United States this month. The conference will concern the Government’s half million dollar claim against Levine in connection with post war salvage material, the Jewish Daily Bulletin correspondent here is informed by the Department of Justice. The purpose of the New York Conference will be to reach an amicable settlement if possible otherwise a civil suit against Levine will become necessary.

It was repeated by Department officers that there is nothing unusual in this claim against Levine. More than one hundred claims of a similar character against other parties are pending.

Some resentment was expressed against the efforts made by New York Jewish newspapers to give the impression that anti-Jewish feeling is involved. This is incorrect, officials declare, asserting that the government would have been more insistent in its claim which was pending before Levine made the non-stop trans-Atlantic flight but has shown Levine every courtesy.

JOSEPH MARCUS, LATE BANKER, LAID TO REST

Funeral services for the late Joseph S. Marcus, President of the Bank of the United States, who died on Sunday, were held Monday in the Temple of the Congregation Bnai Jeshurun, West 88th Street, New York.

The services were conducted by Dr. Israel Goldstein, assisted by the Rev. Jacob Schwartz, cantor.

The funeral cortege was headed by a police motorcycle squad. Burial was in Union Fields Cemetery, Brooklyn.

Among those attending the services were Supreme Court Justice Aaron J. Levy, Judge Albert J. Cohn of the Bronx County Court, George C. Van Tuly, former State Superintendent of Banks; Joseph H. Cohen, President of Beth Israel Hospital; Max Weinstein, and Magistrate Maurice H. Gottlieb.

Joseph Marcus became prominent in banking circles after coming to America as an immigrant boy. He was born April 9, 1862, at Memel, Germany, near the Russian border. When he was seventeen, with little more than his passage money, he came to New York.

Mr. Marcus found employment as a tailor in a clothing shop. He remained at this trade for twenty-five years.

In 1906 he founded the Public Bank of New York, of which he became president and director.

Six years later he founded the Bank of the United States.

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