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London Executive Member Issues a Statement on Weizmann–wise Incident

Recites Details of Political Commission Proceedings in Answer to Wise’s Cleveland Address (Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

A statement dealing with the Weizmann-Wise incident in the political commission at the Zionist Congress in Basle was issued today by Dr. M. D. Eder, member of the London Executive, in connection with the cabled reports of the address of Dr. Stephen S. Wise in which reference was made to the incident.

“Neither Dr. Weizmann nor myself, nor any other member of the Executive took objection to any of the criticism, however violent or incorrect, voiced in the political commission with regard to the administration and the Executive. What we did oject to was the resolution of Mr. Abraham Tulin. Our objection was based on the fact that this resolution ignored the future Executive by asking for the establishment of a special commission over its head. Dr. Wise’s share in the introduction of this resolution is unknown to the Executive and I believe also to the other members of the commission except Mr. Tulin and Mr. Guedalla who helped frame it.

“Dr. Weizmann’s difficulty was not with the resolution of Mr. Tulin but with the apparent defection of American Zionists. Dr. Weizmann was not present when Dr. Wise resigned from the political commission and left the room.

“We regarded the resolution as an expression of lack of confidence in the Executive which was about to be elected. In view of the attitude of Mr. Tulin, Mr. B. Shelvin and Mr. Bernard G. Richards, who violently attacked the Executive in connection with its dealings with the British Government, I asked Dr. Weizmann to get in touch with the American delegation to ascertian their attitude, Dr. Weizmann attended the session of the political commission only on the third day, when he explained the matter of the Jewish Agency and remarked that he will be unable to carry on if the Americans are not behind him. Thereupon Mr. Charles Cowan declared that Mr. Tulin’s resolution was not discussed by the American delegation.

“The attitude of Mr. Tulin, Mr. Shelvin and Mr. Richards was so marked that Vladimir Jabotinsky stated it was hardly necessary for him to say anything since Mr. Tulin had expressed all of his criticism. even in stronger language. A representative of the Left remarked as an introduction to his statement that ‘what I am going to say will almost seem a defense of the Executive in view of the foregoing three speeches.'”

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