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Jews Very Susceptible to Conversion is Boast of London Missionaries

(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

The assertion that Jews are one of the most susceptible groups to the conversion work of Christion missionaries was made at the one hundred and twentieth anniversary celebration here of the Church Missions to Jews, known as the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews. No figures as to the number of Jews converted by the Church Missions during the 120 years of its existence were presented to substantiate this assertion. It was brought out in the address of the Bishop of Salisbury, that hatred of Jews is one of the reasons why missionary work fails.

In a review of the past year presented by the Rev. C. H. Gill, secretary, he referred to a recent statement made by Dr. John R. Mott of New York who had stated: “I can announce the Jewish as one of the most widely open doors.”

Recent reports from missions in Europe, Asia and Africa confirm this opinion, the secretary said.

“The testimony from America also bears it out,” he continued. “The witness from our mission stations bears eloquent testimony to the fact that Jewry is on the move. Mogador keeps up its monthly record of over 3,000 attendances of Jews; Tunisia and Algeria bear testimony to the readiness of the Jews in that part to receive and even purchase the Christian messages brought by the colporteurs; the Cairo schools report a growth of over 300 scholars and numbers are only limited by lack of accommodation; in Palestine the Church at Jaffa is regularly filled to overflowing with Jews; in Persia, despite the political difficulties, the numbers of enquirers, of those under instruction, and even of baptisms are unequalled in our days; in Eastern Europe, where our new Warsaw buildings are now completed, though not completely paid for, the mission hall is regularly well-filled, and it is probable another large room will have to be thrown into the hall. Encouraging reports are also received from other stations such as Hamburg, Rotterdam, and London,” he said.

The Bishop of Salisbury, chairman of the Missionary Council, said that there was no doubt that the Church as a whole was cold about this work. People had despaired about converting the Jews; that very largely was the reason why they had neglected the work. He thought they could not ignore a still more shameful reason. There still is a certain heritage of the old hatred. Although it did not take the form of actual hatred, it did not show much love, and where there was no love there would be no conversions.

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