Jewish Ministerial Director Left Behind by Zeppelin Explains Why

(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

Two versions as to why Dr. Herman Badt, Ministerial Director in the Prussian Government, a Jew, scheduled to be a passenger on the Graf Zeppelin on its trans-Atlantic flight, was left behind are current in Berlin today.

According to a’ report published in the “Vossiche Zeitung.” Dr. Badt arrived a few minutes too late to board the Zeppelin Another version ascribes his being lin. Another version ascribes his being ites who objected to including a Jew on the historic flight.

Dr. Badt, interviewed by the representative of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, denied both assertions. Dr. Hugo Eckener had decided to invite representatives of eighteen German states to participate in the flight. Due to the fact that the Prussian government members were detained by their parliamentary duties. Dr. Badt was originally slated to represent Prussia. However, shortly before the flight, the Prussian parliament adjourned, thus enabling Dr. Albert Grzesinsky to make the journey, Dr. Badt explained.

Dr. Badt added that at a banquet after the trial journey of the Zeppelin, Dr. Eckener invited him to come to America under any circumstances. It developed, however, later that for technical reasons an additional passenger would make a considerable difference as the last weighing of the airship showed that adding to the passenger list would be an impossibility. No other motive can be charged, Dr. Badt declared.

COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITORI

Sir:

In your issue for Tuesday, October 16, 1928, at the beginning of page four, you report me as having stated at the New York meeting of the Association for Z. O. A. Reorganization as follows:

“The naming of an estimable gentleman as Executive Director, whose mental operations are more difficult to understand than any one I know, does not alter the situation so long as the present cabinet is not discharged.”

Your quotation is in error. I did not make the remarks attributed to me. I said in subtance that the Executive Director recently app##ntea by the Z. O A. is an estimable gentleman but I did not think his appointment would change the situation and I cited the recent instance where the Executive Director, together with the Chairman of the Administrative Committee made specific recommendations as to a matter of major policy, namely, certain conditions as to participation by Hadassah in the U. P. A. and their recommendations were overruled and disregarded I did not say however, that the mental operations of the Executive Director “are more difficult to understand than any one I know” or anything like it. My remarks on that score expressly and plainly referred to another gentleman whose mental operations I am unable to comprehend, not to the Executive Director.

Yours truly,

Robert Szold

New York, Oct. 17, 1928

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