J. D. B. News Letter

A Kosher bill, similar to the bills already on the statute books in the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and other states and in Washington, D. C., was introduced yesterday in the Massachusetts House of Representatives by Representative Bernard A. Ginsburg of Dorchester. There is also a special clause in this bill calling upon any local Board of Health to enter the premises where food represented to be kosher is sold.

This bill has the support both of the United Butcher’s Association and Orthodox rabbis. Rabbi Louis M. Epstein and Abram Alpert are sponsoring the bill. A public hearing will be held February 19 by the Committee on Public Health when all parties concerned will be given an opportunity to voice their opinion on this proposed statute.

When the bill is passed by the House of Representatives, it goes for approval to the Massachusetts Senate and then for final approval by the Governor of the Commonwealth. The new bill is known as chapter 94 of the General Laws which calls for amending by striking off section 156 that is now on the Massachusetts statute books.

This legislation is calculated to give official recognition to the sale of kosher food in Massachusetts in accordance with the Orthodox requirements. Those violating the bill will be punished by not less than a fine of $25 and not more than $500. The United Butcher’s Association in cooperation with the rabbis is behind this legislation with a view to creating a uniform kosher law.

“Whoever falsely stamps or labels any can jar or other package containing fruit or food of any kind, or permits such stamping or labelling or violates either of the two preceding sections, or sells or exposes for sale any meat or meat product or any food containing meat ingredients or prepared with meat substance or meat fat and falsely represents the same to be kosher or as having ben prepared in accordance with the orthodox Hebrew religious requirements either by direct statements, orally or in writing, or by the display of the word ‘kosher’ in any language or by the display of any sign or mark in simulation of such word, or by the display of any insignia, six-pointed star or any mark which might reasonably be calculated to deceive or lead a reasonable person to believe that a representation is being made that the food sold is kosher or prepared in accordance with the Orthodox Hebrew religious requirements; or sells both kosher and non-kosher meat or meat products or any food containing meat ingredients or prepared with meat substance or fat and at the same time displays a sign on his door or window or anywhere in (Continued on Page 4)

“This section shall be enforced by the local board of health and for such purpose any person designated by it shall have the right to enter upon premises where food represented to be kosher is sold or exposed for sale at any reasonable time during business hours and inspect such food.”

NEXT STORY