Snell Cites Ways to Foster Arab Jewish Cooperation

Forty-two proposals made by Harry Snell, Labo # member of the Shaw Commission which investigated the causes of last year’s riots, are published by the Brith Shalom organization headed by Dr. Judah L. Magnes, Dean of the Hebrew University. The proposals urge that Arab-Jewish cooperation be fostered, that the government should appoint Arab and Jewish members on the existing committees for railways, harbors, roads, comerce, industry, etc., and give preference to officials knowing three languages.

Arab mukhtars, states Snell, in the interest of fostering friendly relations, should visit the meetings of the Jewish colonies’ councils, when questions affecting the Arabs are discussed.

URGES MIXED CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE

Mixed Jewish-Arab chambers of commerce should be reestablished, Mr. Snell feels, and mixed federations of manufacturers and trade unions should be formed. Jewish credit organizations should extend credit to Arabs, he emphasizes, and encourage the formation of Arab cooperatives. Jewish research organizations should extend their research into Arab areas and Arabs should be admitted to Jewish schools.

Evening classes teaching Arabs Hebrew and Jews Arabic are a necessity in promoting friendly relations, Mr. Snell states, and mixed community centers should be opened containing libraries and recreational opportunities. Jewish medical institutions should extend their social service to include the Arabs and their professional societies as well. The Jewish Agency for Palestine, should, he feels, have a special member to concentrate on the Arab-Jewish relations.

JEWISH RESEARCH GROUP

Among other suggestions made by Snell are that a Jewish research group should be formed to investigate political, social and economic conditions of the Arabs, and that the Hebrew University should conduct an adult Summer School in Arab-Jewish relations. A wider knowledge of Arab history and culture should be obligatory in the Hebrew schools and the Arab schools should insist on a knowledge of Hebrew culture. Mixed committees for the promotion of Arab-Jewish cooperation should be formed. Government officials, Masonic lodges, the Quaker and Bahai communities should assist Arab-Jewish cooperation in areas where the population is mixed. The Jewish Agency, concludes Mr. Snell, should more clearly define its Arab policy and continually emphasize its position.

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