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Opening of New College Year Revives Numerus Clausus Question in Hungary

The numerus clausus question is again becoming serious in Hungary with the beginning of registration for the new year in the University of Budapest. The situation is particularly acute in the school of medicine which is refusing to admit “too many” Jewish students, although all of the Jewish applicants passed their entrance examinations with distinction. The other schools of the University have increased their enrollment of Jewish students.

Intervention with Count Kuno Klebelsberg, Hungarian minister of education, by Jewish members of parliament has thus far proved unavailing, Count Klebelsberg having pointed out that the recent Hungarian Medical Congress had complained that there was an over-supply of physicians. By the terms of the amended numerus clausus law seven percent of the University’s enrollment is permitted to be Jewish. The Jewish population of Budapest, however, is 20 percent of the total.

Three Jewish deputies, Joseph Pakots, leader of the Democratic Party; M. Fabian and M. Brody, have voiced their dissatisfaction with Count Klebelsberg’s reply. They complain that the government has no right to dictate to the students or their parents to adopt professions other than those desired, particularly since the Jewish citizens are paying their taxes and fulfilling all their obligations to the Hungarian state. Hence the deputies insist that the Jewish students are entitled to study at Hungarian universities according to their wishes without being compelled to obtain their education at foreign institutions of learning.

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