Mexican Congress Unlikely to Approve Proposed Restrictive Legislation Against Jews

While the reports that have been cabled from Mexico City to the effect that measures to be considered shortly by the Federal Congress, would, if passed, seriously prejudice the status of Jews, as regards business and by prohibiting them from marrying native Mexicans, have aroused tremendous interest among the Jewish population the facts in the case thus far hardly warrant the sensation that has been made.

Although it is true that nationalist organizations, and even the National Chamber of Commerce, have proposed measures that would deprive Jews and Chinese of their licenses to operate places of business and would make it illegal for them to marry Mexicans well-informed quarters here consider it entirely unlikely that Congress would enact legislation giving effect to such proposals.

Only a few days ago President Rubio stated that his administration would not permit persecution of the stranger within the gates of Mexico, this statement being the result of an inquiry made by Chinese societies in the Federal district.

Meanwhile the closing of a synagogue here has heightened the impression that Mexico is rapidly becoming anti-Semitic, although according to an official statement made this morning the closure was due to the congregation’s failure to pay attention to the laws and requirements that make it necessary for a permit to be obtained by any group wishing to worship in a public place.

This is in accord with the constitution as well as the laws for the regulation of cults. So far as the situation is surveyable at this moment the Mexican Federal government appears to be uninclined to apply the harsh measures which certain anti-foreign groups would like to see enforced.

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