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Death of Sir Charles Mandleberg

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Sir G. Charles Mandleberg, chairman and managing director of Messrs. J. Mandleberg and Co. Ltd., waterproof manufacturers, Pendleton, and chairman of Harben’s (Viscose Silk Manufacturers), Ltd., died yesterday in his seventysecond year.

Sir Charles was born in Manchester, and his family was well known in Manchester Jewry. His father, Joseph Mandleberg, was engaged before him in the waterproof trade. While a young man he entered his father’s business, which took its present form in 1889, members of the Rothband family becoming associated with it. He leaves two sons, Colonel L. C Mandleberg and Mr. J. H. Mandleberg.

He was knighted in 1918. He had taken an active part in recruiting the Salford battalions during the war. He was a founder of the British Manufacturers’ Corporation, later merged in the Federation of British Industries, of which he became a vice-president. The British Manufacturers’ Corporation was formed in Manchester, largely on his initiative, with the object of developing export trade through the appointment of British trade commissioners abroad.

For most of his life Sir Charles Mandleberg was a member of the Liberal Party, but in 1927 he found himself in general disagreement with Mr. Lloyd George and a large section of the Liberals. Accordingly he threw in his lot with the Conservatives. In the letter announcing this decision he emphasised his belief that “nothing but stagnation, decay, and misery can result from Socialism in practice”. The Liberal Party, he added, gave him no hope of an anti-Socialist policy.

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