Menu JTA Search

Doak Rules Foreign Students in U.S. May Not Be Employed on Penalty of Deportation

SIGN UP FOR THE JTA DAILY BRIEFING

Foreign students who have been admitted to the United States outside the quota in order to study at accredited American institutions are prohibited from engaging in any employment other than that which will permit them to pay for board or room or part of their tuition expenses, in a new interpretation of the non-quota student provisions of the immigration law by Secretary of Labor William N. Doak.

The new interpretation of the immigration law is to apply after October 15th. Between 1,500 to 2,500 of the 10,000 foreign students now in the United States will be affected by this new interpretation, it is believed.

Secretary Doak rules that henceforth a student applying for admission outside the quota “must be able to show that adequate financial provision has been made or is satisfactorily assured, which will enable him to maintain an interrupted student status.

“If any such student already here or hereafter admitted to the United States engages in any business or occupation for profit or labors for hire, he shall be deemed to have forfeited his status and shall be liable to arrest and deportation.”

In addition Harry E. Hull, Commissioner General of Immigration, has instructed immigration officers to require the posting of a $500 bond in doubtful student cases.

Secretary Doak’s withdrawal of working rights from foreign students has aroused the opposition of such leading educators as Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, president of Columbia University; Dr. John H. MacCracken, associate director of the American Council on Education; Dr. Cloyd H. Marvin of George Washington University and Dr. William J. Cooper, Commissioner of Education of the Department of Interior.

NEXT STORY