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Opening of Conference

The Central conference of American Rabbis at the opening session of its forty-third meeting here yesterday at the Hotel Sinton listened to a resolution calling for the American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, the B’nai Brith, the Zionist Organization of America and all other other Jewish orders to call a conference to form a joint Committee of American Jews whose duty it will be to deal with the problems which confront the Jews.

The resolution was proposed by Professor Jacob Marcus reporting on contemporaneous history.

A second resolution proposed that the Central Conference call on this Committee, if organized, to call a world conference of Jewish leaders to cope with international and national problems which confront the Jews.

Both resolutions were referred back to the Committee headed by Professor Marcus for “changes in wording and reconsideration” following which they will be brought to the convention floor.

Dr. Marcus stated in his report that nothing the Jews can ever do will placate anti-Semites save national, racial and religious suicide. No denial of relations to world Jewry has ever lessened the attacks on Jewry in Germany, Hungary, Austria, Russia, Poland and Canada. Therefore, since anti-Semitism is an international movement capable of rapid spread and fraught with danger, it can only be met by united national and international organization and by united resistance, Dr. Marcus asserted.

The conference was opened by Rabbi Morris Newfield, president of the organization.

Rabbi Newfield reviewed the condition of the Jews in Eastern and Central Europe and in Palestine, calling attention to the urgent need for financial aid and moral support for the stricken Jewish communities abroad. He recommended that the “Conference vote its continued confidence in the beneficent work carried on by both the Joint Distribution Committee and the Jewish Agency and endorse the appeals of these two agencies to American Israel”.

Rabbi Newfield called upon the Central Conference to declare its stand on the world Jewish congress called for the summer of 1934.

Rabbi David Lefkowitz warned of the danger to America’s greatest contribution and achievement, namely the separation of the church and state.

Rabbi Edward L. Israel, reporting for the Commission on Social Justice called attention to the increasing influence of the religious point of view among some of the leading men of the country.

A report was delivered by Rabbi Max C. Currick on the Committee on International Peace. Rabbi Bernard J. Bamberger spoke on the “Beginnings of Modern Jewish Scholarship.”

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