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Letters to the Editor

To the Editor of the Jewish Daily Bulletin,

Our attention is called to a news article published in your issue of June 18, 1933, namely “Man who gave world press alarm”, where Hitler is called “dull Slovak”.

We Slovaks must protest against this making Hitler one of our nationals, because Hitler never confessed or acknowledged that he is a Slovak and we Slovaks have never known him to be one of our race. For that reason in the interest of fair play we would ask you not to refer to Hitler as a Slovak but as a German, which he really is.

Please remember that the greatest Slovak living is President Masaryk of Czechoslovakia, who, as you well know, is recognized as a friend of the Jews.

Sincerely yours,

Andrew P. Slabey.

Andrew J. Valusek.

PERMANENT SOLUTION

To the Editor of the Jewish Daily Bulletin:

The letter of June 11, suggesting the settlement of the German Jews in Spain through a $50,000,000 subscription from world Jewry, is indeed meritorious. However, under the circumstances, the plan might answer the present emergency. But outside of Palestine we can hardly hope for any permanent solution While Jews may be welcomed in Spain now, they may have to repeat the same historic tragedies in 25 or 50 years from now. It is “unreasonable” to expect a 400-year-old lesson to be remembered by any people, including even Jews. We see even in Latin-American countries, like Mexico, or Cuba, anti-Jewish disturbances and agitation for expulsion.

Palestine is the only permanent solution. All other countries are but a makeshift, except the United States, if immigration bars could be lifted. The tragic plight of the Jews of Poland and Roumania was over-shadowed by the German situation, but nevertheless the conditions exist. I dare say that there are at least 3,000,000 Jews in Europe who are “superfluous”, namely all of the Jews of Germany, about 2,000,000 in Poland, and about 500,000 in Roumania, besides other minor countries. To transplant 3,000,000 Jews into Palestine and Transjordania is not impossible under scientific direction, if we recall some ten years ago that about a million Greek refugees were transplanted from Asia Minor under international supervision. Neither is it necessary to prove Palestine’s absorptive capacity. Dr. Arthur Ruppin shows that Palestine supported 3,500,000 Jews in ancient times, under more crude agricultural implements. With industrial projects added, it ought to sustain at least as many as Belgium, according to area, about 7,500,000.

This emergency involves the problem of minorities, and ought to be taken up by the League of Nations, which should open Palestine and Transjordania for mass migration. The cost of transportation and settlement of 3,000,000 Jews in Palestine can be defrayed by an international or Anglo-American loan in the form of credits, just as the R.F.C. recently advanced credits of $50,000,000 to China for our surplus wheat.

If the total value of Jewish investments in Palestine is approximately $200,000,000 and the Jewish population nearly 200,000, the aver age per capita is about $1,000. It costs therefore about $4,000 to settle a family on land in Palestine, and for 3,000,000 Jews about $3,000,000,000—a sum which, according to President Roosevelt, can reabsorb 3,000,000 American unemployed. Our government is best able to extend such credits for our surplus products, such as food, clothing, machinery, raw materials, transportation, etc., to transplant 3,000,000 Jews to Palestine. Besides, it can help America’s economic recovery.

With Palestine as the only prosperous spot in the world, no difficulty ought to be encountered in procuring these credits. Tel Aviv having redeemed its municipal bonds is evidence that this loan can easily be paid in a given time. Jewish enterprise can develop the Orient to its maximum possibilities,—commercially, industrially, agriculturally, and scientifically. Instead of concentrating upon the development of German culture only to be resented by “Aryans”, the German Jews can develop Hebrew culture to be welcomed at the Hebrew University. Instead of helping Germany in another war, Jewish chemists and Nobel prize winners, like Haber and Wilstaetter, can develop the chemical and mineral resources of the Dead Sea and supply the world with potash and other minerals hidden there. Thus, eventually, the bulk of world Jewry might be attracted to Palestine and vicinity, instead of feeling themselves “thrust” upon other countries against the wishes of the natives.

It must also be remembered that Palestine is situated between three continents, having two-thirds of the world’s population,—over a billion,—and therefore with tremendous commercial possibilities which would more than repay the loan,—perhaps it might enhance the prosperity of the world?

Rabbi Samuel Horowitz,

Temple Beth El, Sunbury Pa.

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