Activities of the American Jewish Woman; in Social, Religious, Communal Aspects

Information intended for use in this department, including announcements of meetings and other events, should be sent to the Editor of the Jewish Daily Bulletin as far in advance of publication as possible.

Junior Hadassah, the young women’s Zionist organization of America, will meet for its tenth annual convention in Chicago, at the Palmer House, August 27. Delegates coming from every part of the United States will discuss during the three days’ session the problems confronting the 175 units of Junior Hadassah and will plan for the coming year. The first session will concern itself with the problems of membership and its closely allied branches—Senior Hadassah and Young Judaea. Though Junior Hadassah’s membership increased during the past year, it hopes to raise the figure from 8,123 to 10,000.

The second session will be devoted to fund-raising and to Jewish National Fund work. Junior Hadassah raised $30,000 for its Palestine Fund and $10,000 for the Jewish National Fund. The Palestinian Report will be given at the fourth session. This report will cover the three Palestinian projects of the organization: Meier Shfeyah (the children’s village), Pardess Anna, (the orange grove and training farm for graduates of Meier Shfeyah) and the Nurses’ Training School. More than $35,000 was sent to Palestine for this work last year.

THE WOMEN’S LEAGUE

The Women’s League of the United Synagogue is planning to urge its constituent groups to intensify their educational program for the coming season. To facilitate the sisterhoods’ individual endeavors in that direction, the League offers publications of special value. “The Three Pillars” and “Modern Problems of Jewish Parents” are designed to prove helpful to those sisterhoods interested in forming study groups.

Mordecai Soloff, educational director of Temple Beth El of Providence, and member of the placement committee of the Teacher Registry of the United Synagogue, will speak on “Jewish Education” over station WINS at 3:45 on Wednesday afternoon, August 9.

NATIONAL COUNCIL, JEWISH WOMEN

Headquarters of the National Council of Jewish Women is busily engaged answering inquiries concerning suffering individuals in Germany. Relatives from California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Mississippi, Texas, Missouri, Illinois, Massachusetts, etc., have been writing for advice regarding the possibilities of emigration of their German relatives to other lands, including the United States. The mails from Germany bring urgent letters from physicians, dentists, lawyers, lecturers, social workers and teachers, seeking a way out.

Information regarding immigration laws and documentary requirements for admission to the United States are being sent on to, all the Sections of the National Council of Jewish Women, in answer to requests from the chairmen of Committees on Service to Foreign Born.

While the National Council of Jewish Women, through its local Sections, handles hundreds of international cases each month as part of its regular program, the exigencies of the present German situation make it essential that cooperation be established with every agency working in this field and this cooperation the National Council of Jewish Women is prepared to give to the fullest extent possible.

A number of Sections of the National Council of Jewish Women are cooperating with Peace organizations to celebrate Peace Pact Day, to be held on August 27th. The Duluth, Minnesota, Council Section is planning a community celebration in the public park.

Radio talks, addresses and appropriate programs are being arranged by other Council Sections.

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