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Slants on Sports

Will the Lavender colors sported by the City College gridiron stalwarts be proved a pale replica of the Violet juggernaut when the Beavers tackle the Hall of Famers in their intercity clash tomorrow afternoon at Ohio Field ? Or will the boys from University Heights lend their weight to the statement that the Violet is a synonym for good teams and Lavender merely a combination that goes with old lace?

The clash tomorrow afternoon will tell the tale of the new regimes at both institutions. The series between City and N. Y. U. began in the 1880’s with the number of games won thus far in favor of the St. Nick’s. When this internecine warfare was continued back in the twenties, after a layoff of some thirty odd years. City managed to slip in a victory or so. However, N. Y. U. connived to sneak a couple of one-sided wins over on the boys from Prexy Robinson’s bailiwick and the series ended with one up in favor of C. C. N. Y.

Tomorrow’s clash will mark the first time in a decade that the two city teams have met on the gridiron—and there’ll be plenty of fireworks. The Beavers, battered, bruised, and bedraggled after their fight against the overwhelming Meehan men from Manhattan, are still aching for a crack at the lads from N. Y. U. It seems to this lad that they’ll be aching long after the results have been inscribed on the books.

FRIEDMAN AND STEVENS—OLD RIVALS

When these two teams renew their old grid rivalry. Benny Friedman and Mal Stevens, coaches of the two elevens, will have more than an ordinary interest in seeing their charges follow through.

There is a personal feud existing between Friedman and Stevens which started in those glamorous days when Benny was an assistant Eli coach under his lordship, Sir Malvin Stevens.

The fight was bitter but silent. Friedman did things his way and showed results in that terrible Princeton slaughter when the Bulldog passed the Tiger to death for a 51-14 score. Friedman coached only one season . . . it was enough.

Friedman had a chance to show that Stevens’ coaching ability is a loss to the medical profession. However, Manhattan ruined all that. Benny’s best bets took a terrific beating and may not even see any action whatsoever tomorrow. Not only that, but the Violets have the edge in weight, experience, and numbers. Yet, Friedman is by no means pessimistic. He thinks that N. Y. U. has failed to demonstrate any scoring punch this season and that, if the C. C. N. Y. #ads can manage to stop the Violet attack, a Lavender victory is likely, because the tricky Beaver offense will have the Violets at a disadvantage throughout.

COOPER AGAINST SIEGAL

Last week it was the Jews matching wits against the Irish. Tomorrow will see two Jewish lads directing their teams. Both are the brains, the sparkplug, and the scoring threats of their machines. Both are brilliant football players. The two boys, nearly the same age, height, and weight, are triple threat men Each can pass, kick and run with equal dangerous dexterity.

Siegal will have a strong, powerful, and experienced line in front of him with an excellent line bucker in Nat Machlowitz, former all-scholastic player from Monroe. Cooper, playing with ruptured muscles in his abdomen and chest, will have a tricky, fast, but light and injured club.

It’s the last game for Cooper as a college player. Siegal has another year to play before he ends his college career. We’d like to see C.C.N.Y. come through because we like Friedman and his Beavers, but we’re convinced that Siegal, Machlowitz and Co. will have raised on high the Violet by tomorrow night.

IN THE MAIL BOX

Irving Kupcinet, quarterback on the University of North Dakota football team, writes in to say: “At present there are only three Jewish football players in the North Central conference, of which North Dakota is a member. The two, Braverman, a tackle, and myself, playing with the University of North Dakota, have been mentioned before in your columns. Another, Izzy Ginsberg, of South Dakota State, is a star end. He lived in Boston, Mass., and is playing his second year for the Jack Rabbits.

“Last season was a banner year for Jewish athletes in our conference. Aside from the three mentioned above, there was Dave Cohen, a tackle on the N.D.U. squad. He also came from Boston. Also, Solly Kramer, South Dakota State’s star signal caller, who came from Brookings, S. D.”

Irving Jaffe, who holds more ice skating records than any man in sporting history, wrote in the following: “I recently read the most interesting and capable story that you wrote in the Jewish Daily Bulletin.

“It was well written and most inspiring to read and, while I personally appreciated the compliments bestowed upon me in this article, I feel sure that it will aid in helping other boys and girls of the Jewish faith in their ambitions to participate in clean, healthy sports. At the same time I am convinced that the United States Maccabi Association is the only movement to further a better relationship among Jewish people and the rest of the world through its medium of clean sports and its message of good sportsmanship. With kindest wishes (signed) Irving Jaffe.”

ALONG CAULIFLOWER ROW . . .

Old “Pop” Foster, manager of his fighting Irish terror, champion Jimmy McLarnin, popped into town after his return from Europe and gave us the low down on the Berg-Mizler affair. “It was a good scrap,” said Pop, “but it only netted $16,000. I couldn’t possibly bring my Jimmy over there for a Jeff Dickson promotion.”

How about the Berg-Mizler affair?

“It was a real scrap, but fighters these days seem to be getting brittle. Mizler, a game guy, if there ever was one, entered the tenth with both hands broken. It was a one-sided fight all the way. Believe you me, Jackie Berg’s triumph was an astonishing triumph. You know, I saw that fight as guest of Jimmy Walker. He’s homesick.”

What did you think of Mizler in the opening rounds?

“Nope,” continued Foster, “if Barney Ross wants a fight with my Jimmy he’ll have to wait until next summer and he’ll have to fight twenty rounds. That’s the distance any championship fight should go. Oh yes, Mizler was the least comfortable champion I have watched for some time. He was worried by Berg’s terrific fierceness. Not once was he able to overcome Berg’s furious fighting. However, it wasn’t anything to talk about and the licking my Jimmy gave Barney was worse than the one Mizler took.”

Well folks, that’s what an Irishman would say.

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