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Austria, Poland

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by Neville Laski

ally enough to damp their enthusiasm for ameliorative measures.

Very few of the Jewish leaders were able to offer constructive suggestions for the improvement of the situation. Emigration on a large scale is out of the question, and the economic crisis throughout the world excludes the possibility of substantial help from abroad. There was indeed the suggestion that Jews of other countries should take a greater interest in Poland than had hitherto been the case.

Before finally leaving Poland I was able to interpose a hurried visit to Danzig and Cracow. I found the Danzig Jews living under conditions which are only slightly better than those prevailing in Germany. True, Danzig has no “Aryan” legislation and the Jews have de jure quality of citizenship, but the real power in Danzig is possessed by the Nazi party which, with their storm troops, their unscrupulous propaganda on the platform and in the press and their secret boycott methods, have made the lot of the 8,000 Jews in the state very difficult to bear.

The prominent Jews and also Mr. Lester, the High Commissioner, with whom I spoke were bound to admit that there seemed to be no easy way of alleviating the Jewish situation. It is hardly necessary to add that in Mr. Lester the Jews have an authority who will staunchly uphold their legal rights.

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