Relaxing Laws

In two countries—Mexico and Brazil—voices have been raised this week to recommend relaxation of the immigration laws existing there. In Brazil this issue was raised by the press. In Mexico it came as a special recommendation of the Mexican Immigration Council which consists of representatives of all government departments.

The call to relax immigration regulations of these two American countries is no doubt of interest to Jews. Though no specific reference is made to Jewish immigrants, it is nevertheless clear that if the immigration bars are lifted in Brazil and in Mexico, Jewish prospective immigrants will benefit.

Brazil is especially in need of immigrants who are fit for agricultural work. Mexico, too, could absorb more easily the class of immigrant who would be interested chiefly in settling on land rather than in engaging in trade.

In suggesting to the government that a milder immigration policy be adopted the Immigration Council of Mexico goes out of its way to emphasize that the doors of Mexico should be opened more widely only for immigrants who guarantee that they will not remain city dwellers but will settle on the land.

Though the full text of the recommendation submitted by the Council to the Mexican government is not available as yet, it is nevertheless known that official circles in Mexico are definitely inclined to revise existing immigration regulations.

As to the sentiment of the government of Brazil, it has been indicated on several occasions that the Brazil government would not like to encourage a large Jewish immigration into the country, but would welcome certain categories of Jewish refugees. A number of Jewish doctors from Germany who have proceeded to Brazil have been warmly met by the local population and have been satisfactorily settled there. A limited number of other Jewish professionals from Germany have also found refuge in Brazil.

The sentiments now prevailing in Mexico and Brazil for a less restricted immigration into these countries obviously deserves the attention of Jewish immigration organizations.

NEXT STORY