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Urge Stronger Boycott

The pledge that British labor will support the boycott against Nazi Germany was made this afternoon by A. M. Wall, president of the British Trade Union Council, who delivered the chief address at the Jewish section of the international boycott conference, which opened here last night.

“Jews or Gentiles, black or white, all must unite against the wicked actions of present-day Nazi Germany,” the British trade union official declared. “I feel that the British trade union movement can play a most important part in causing Germany to change her policies.”

GASTER OPENS MEETING

More than 120 delegates from twelve countries were present at the opening sessions. Chacham Moses Gaster delivered the opening speech. Samuel Untermyer, American boycott leader, then delivered a plea for tightening the boycott on German-made goods, emphasizing that the movement against Germany was non-sectarian. He also stressed the fact that the movement was not a boycott, but a counter-boycott against Germany. He appealed to all Jews to join the non-sectarian boycott movement.

Mr. Untermyer also declared he had a strong message on the boycott from the American Federation of Labor which he proposed to read Monday at a session of the conference.

Sessions of the Monday conference will be devoted to committee work and the creation of a strong world-wide boycott organization.

CITRINE TO SPEAK

Walter Citrine, secretary of the British Trade Union group and president of the International Federation of Trade Unions, is scheduled to address the conference tomorrow. Mr. Citrine has just returned from a visit to the United States, where he attended the American Federation of Labor convention in San Francisco. He is noted as an enemy of Fascism and Nazism.

There was considerable confusion at the opening session of the conference when it developed that many delegates thought they were at the non-sectarian boycott section.

Dr. Gaster, speaking for the Jewish Representative Council, declared that the session was purely a Jewish matter called to decide whether the Jewish delegates

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